Mind-image topographies & interiority in Murnane

Regardless of authorial contexts (Murnane & Coetzee), this is a fascinating quote. It’s from the Anthony Uhlmann’s recent review of The Childhood of Jesus, in American Book Review (jan-feb ’14).

In his review of Murnane, Coetzee examines passages from Barley Patch (2009) in which the narrative voice contemplates the nature of fiction and the nature of the self. The self, Murnane’s narrator states, is made up of a “network of images.” Coetzee concludes:

The activity of writing, then, is not to be distinguished from the activity of self-exploration. It consists in contemplating the sea of internal images, discerning connections, and setting these out in grammatical sentences… In other words, while there is a Murnanian topography of the mind, there is no Murnanian theory of the mind worth speaking of… As a writer, Murnane is thus a radical idealist. 

And then later on:

In a passage from Inland (1989) that Coetzee cites in his review, Murnane’s narrator reflects on a quote from Paul Eluard, a poet he claims to know nothing about and to have never read: There is another world but it is in this one. He continues:

The other world… is a place that can only be seen or dreamed of by those people known to us as narrators of books or characters within books. 

Uhlmann’s book, Thinking in Literature: Joyce, Woolf, Nabokov (2011), must be tremendous. A giant theme, and giant writers.

June reading log

As last month, not a particularly satisfying month on the reading front. The stand-out was the Flannery O’Connor “Revelation,” and also parts of Room Temperature by Nicholson Baker, which I greatly admire, despite some profound reservations and a nagging sense of boredom.

*

Meditations - Marcus Aurelius (re-reading, in progress)

“Melanctha” – Gertrude Stein (in Three Lives, 1909)

A Mammal’s Notebook: The Writings of Erik Satie (in progress)

“Revelation” – Flannery O’Connor (in Everything that Rises Must Converge)

Miss Doll, Go Home (1965) – David Markson (stalled)

introduction to The John McPhee Reader

Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation - Gérard Genette (passages)

Whore (2001) - Nelly Arcan

Hysteric (2004, trans. 2014) - Nelly Arcan

Fatal Flaws - Jay Ingram (skimmed)

Writers (2010) - Antoine Volodine (trans. 2014)

Room Temperature (1990) – Nicholson Baker (in progress)

Vathek - William Beckford (stalled)

*

Re-reading in Dubliners (“Grace,” “A Painful Case,” “A Little Cloud”), Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Maldoror, Actress in the House, The Letter Left to Me, The Stoic Comedians: Flaubert, Joyce, and Beckett, The Moviegoer, etc.

Césaire at Mid-Century

I’m quite proud of a long essay I wrote on Aimé Césaire’s poetry (specifically, the collection Solar Throat Slashed (1948) and the long poem “Notebook of a Return to the Native Land” (1939, 1947, 1956)).

The essay is featured in Issue 36 of The Quarterly Conversation, alongside writing by Laura Sims, Steve Donoghue, Scott Esposito, Daniel Green and several others. Check it out. Free as the breeze.

Open letter to Michael Silverblatt

I think if I’m lucky I’m a mentor to people I’ve never met – Michael Silverblatt

Among them, Michael, count me. Your Bookworm Audio Archive is vast, a national treasure-house. It would only be absurd to try to number the hours I’ve spent there, or to attempt a comprehensive list of the writers whose voices it preserves. There’s no usable index to the archive as far as I know, and no easy way to browse… but, it’s staggeringly complete… : Mailer, Didion, Sebald, Morrison, Markson, Kraznahorkai, McElroy, Delillo, Mathews, Vonnegut, Updike, Beattie, Sontag, Vidal… that’s just a start to the endless, endless procession. If this is news to whoever reads this, they’re hereby informed. (See also Silverblatt’s role as host and interviewer of writers at the Lannan Foundation.)

Naturally, I first started going to Bookworm to hear Silverblatt in conversation with particular writers. My thesis supervisor had referred me to the Sebald interview, since I was working on his novels. But it soon became obvious that Silverblatt is himself a most unique and fascinating figure, very experienced, and that he’s gifted with a brilliant mind and a warm, rarely generous temperament.

So thanks, Michael Silverblatt, for that mentorship.

- Jacob

*

And for other bookworms, anyone curious — here’s some places where it’s Silverblatt who’s being interviewed for a change. Enjoy.

* Colin Marshall’s hour-long podcast with Silverblatt, from which the two quotes that lead this article are transcribed (Notebook of Cities and Culture, April 2012);
* Sarah Fay’s interview with Silverblatt (The BelieverJune 2010);
* J. Robert Lennon’s half-hour of audio spent chatting with him (Writers at Cornell, Oct 2010); and, lastly,
* “An evening with Michael Silverblatt” (1:30 audio recording, Cornell, iTunes U).

May reading log

A month of frustrations, with some high points: Virginia Woolf’s writing fills me with wonder, as does Golding’s The Inheritors. Roger Shattuck’s The Banquet Years is long overdue for me, because I’ve known about it and its subjects (Apollinaire, Rousseau, Jarry, Satie) for over 5 years and remained deeply curious about them with every new thing I learned; I’ll have a post or two on it soon. The Silence of the Lambs I read on the endorsements of D.F. Wallace & Steve Donoghue, & it’s great fun & quite masterful–a rare excursion into the thriller genre for me.

On the basis of a few strong endorsements I picked up The Deer Park The Invention of Morel–both I thought were a total waste of time, as is all of Baudrillard’s work (though it was once, circa 2004, so dear to me). The Deer Park is colossally boring, a shameless exploitation of mid-America’s anxieties: marriage, heteropatriarchy, les demi-mondains, society prostitutes, kept women, homosexuality, and other transgressions. Chejfec’s books, two of which I’ve read, are interesting, but not compelling enough to re-read. The Invention of Morel I probably brought too many expectations too.

The best books are the ones that deserve to be re-read. There’s a truism for you.

By the way, yesterday, I had the funny double occurrence of looking up an unknown word in a dictionary (nada), then googling: all the results reference the writer’s use of this rare cryptic word in the passage that served as the starting point for the search:

1) Michel Butor referred to Apollinaire’s ornithological pihis, which we learn might be thought of as a mythological bird from China with only one wing, –  they fly in couples! ; – and

(2) Woolf employs the cryptic jacmanna in chapter 5 or so of To the Lighthouse – obviously a plant, shrub, or tree, I thought, but googling provided results to discussions of how what’s going on in the painting of Lily Briscoe has an indeterminate quality (or something like that). I’ll have to look back. Woolf’s prose takes my breath away.

*

To the Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf (begun, currently reading)

The Invention of Morel (1940; trans. R.L.C. Simms) – Adolfo Bioy Casares

The Deer Park - Norman Mailer (abandoned; what a bore!)

The Banquet Years – Roger Shattuck (so excellent!)

The Inheritors (1955) - William Golding (profound & original)

Blow-Up and Other Stories - Julio Cortazar

The Abortion: An Historical Romance (1966) – Richard Brautigan (skimmed)

“Apollinaire,” “Research on the Technique of the Novel,” “The Novel as Research” – Michel Butor Inventory: Essays (trans. 1968, R. Howard)

The Silence of the Lambs (1988) – Thomas Harris

The Ecstacy of Communication - Jean Baudrillard (skimmed)

The Dark (2000; trans. 2013 H. Cleary) - Sergio Chejfec

*

Re-reading in Hind’s Kidnap, Murphy, Ms. Dalloway, Slaughterhouse-Five, Recollections of the Golden Triangle, and Siddhartha.

Golding’s Inheritors

A high point of my month’s reading was William Golding’s second novel The Inheritors (1955), which followed after his first and of course most successful novel, Lord of the Flies. I somehow have two copies, both Faber & Faber, with some pretty great cover illustrations by Paul Hogarth (L) & Neil Gower (R).

Golding, Inheritors, covers

The novel is structured around the idea of a Neanderthal tribe coming into contact with a more advanced tribe, presumably the first humans, or representative of such. It’s not difficult to read; it’s really quite a masterpiece, and it’s about the birth of the human race even. Therefore, I highly recommend it. I’ll leave off with a citation from the penultimate paragraph of John Carey’s introduction to the centenary edition which I think rightly sums up Golding’s achievement.

The greatness of The Inheritors does not depend on Golding imagining what Neanderthals might have been like. It depends on the language he fashions to express it. He accepts the colossal stylistic challenge of seeing everything from a Neanderthal point of view. By feats of language that are at first bewildering he takes us inside a being whose senses, especially smell and hearing, are acute, but who cannot connect sensations into a train of thought. This is a being whose awareness is a stream of metaphors and for whom everything is alive. Intricate verbal manoeuvres force us to share the adventures – and the pathos and the tragedy – of a consciousness that is fearless, harmless, loving, minutely observant and incapable of understanding anything.

M Heppner & J McElroy at Apexart

Joseph McElroy and Mike Heppner did a paired reading in late April at Apexart, which was recorded. The text, which is partly about the 2013 Boston marathon event, is called “What We Noticed.” Check out the video (21:31).

Albert Mobilio, who is from what I can tell a very accomplished critic, was there as the host or moderator of the readings. Event info & videos of other author readings (Wendy S. Walters, Siddhartha DebCatherine Texier, & Minna Proctor) are here at Apex.

Now if you haven’t, go read Mike Heppner’s The Man Talking Project, because it is profound and jugular.

April reading log

various poems – Catullus (trans. P. Green)

Jacob’s Room - Virginia Woolf

Manhattan Transfer (1923) – John Dos Passos (abandoned at about p. 80)

Solar Throat Slashed: The Original Unexpurgated 1948 Edition - Aimé Césaire (trans. Arnold & Eshleman, 2011; re-reading)

Blow-Up and Other Stories - Julio Cortazar (some stories)

Little Disturbances of Man – Grace Paley (some stories)

Radio (2002) – Tonu Onnepalu (trans. Adama Cullen, 2014)

Between Two Worlds (2008) – Sergio Chejfec (skimmed)

“Tenth of December” (2012) – George Saunders

 * * *

The Woolf, Paley, Onnepalu, and Chejfec were highlights this month. There’s more Woolf and Chejfec ahead for me. Lots of good acquisitions at an Ottawa used book sale, at a local branch library, including lots of Woolf’s books (amazing to think that Jacob’s Room, Mrs. Dalloway, Orlando, To the Lighthouse, and The Waves all came out or were written, I think, correct me if I’m wrong, in the decade 1922-1932.

Chejfec on the Internet & cognition

“[...] my morale as a walker had been in a bad way for some time. / The reasoning that follows may seem a bit abstract, so I’ll expound on it quickly. When I walk, my impression is that a digital sensibility overtakes me, one governed by overlapping windows. I say this not with pride but with annoyance: nothing worse could happen to me, because it affects my intuitive side and feels like a prison sentence. The places or circumstances that have drawn my attention take the from of Internet links, and this isn’t only true for the objects themseleves, which are generally urban, part of the life of the street or of the city as a whole, shaped precisely and distinguished from their surroundings, but also the associations they call to mind, the recollection of what is observed, which may be related, kindred, or quite distinct, depending on whichever way these links are formed. On a walk an image will lead me into a memory or into several, and these in turn summon other memories or connected thoughts, often by chance, etc., all creating a delirious branching effect that overwhelms me and leaves me exhausted. I’m a victim, that is, of the early days of the Internet, when wandering or surfing the Web was governed less by destiny or by the efficiency of search engines that it is today, and one drifted among things that were similar, irrelevant, or only loosely related. Until one reached the point of exhaustion over the needlessly prolonged Internet journey, with an ensuing loss of motivation to delve (or in my case, walk) any further, and then the moment of distortion would arrive, or of parallel nature, I don’t know which, when I would notice that every object had essentially turned into a link, and its own materiality had moved into the background, whose depth was virtual, peripheral and free-floating. / [ . . . ] It’s impossible for me to know how different my old-time, pre-Internet perceptions were; they probably were, in diverse ways. Before the Internet, my sense of a city was organized differently: my first impressions were stamped with their origins and the specific times, as it were, of their formation; they were bounded by the passage of time and by new experiences. And, in the resulting sedimentation, each memory retained its relative autonomy. But after the Internet, it happened that the same system formatted my sensibility, which ever since has tended to link events, in sequences of familiarity, though these sequences may be forced and often ridiculous. Those sequences of familiarity lead to groupings that are more or less volatile, it’s true, that nonetheless tend to leave what’s unique to each impression on a secondary plane, diluting in part the thickness of the experience.”

- Sergio Chejfec, My Two Worlds, p. 18-20 (Mis dos mundos, 2008; trans. Margaret B. Carson, Open Letter, 2011)

From ‘You Bright and Risen Angels’

Nowadays, as one lounges out on the porch of an evening, in a folding lawn chair of finished redwood, it is scarcely possible to recall the limitations of those days. It seems that our memory typewriters and compact disk players have been around forever, like wise infinitely reliable mentors and administrators of our sport. In front of me the automatic sprinkler crawls steadily along the garden hose which my father has cunningly laid across his lawn; and from the Carsons’ house on Woodbine Court I can hear the metronome-like ticking of the children’s robot playing house with Robbie in the garage. A jet plane shoots happily through the blue sky, bound, perhaps, for another covert bombing mission in Nicaragua, where the colorfully dressed, brown-skinned population still resists our directive to BUCKLE DOWN and WORK because for them every day is a fiesta day in their pink or yellow or green brick houses in the cool mountains when WE are drumming our fingers and impatiently waiting for our Buddy Brand or Dodger’s Choice instant coffee to be harvested so that we can zip down to the office in our station wagons and set new goals and trends in productivity, because without us electrical consumption would sink to its nadir. – But if you will just stop dancing with the dishwasher for a moment I, Big George, will describe to you in loving detail how it all came about, and what life was like for our pioneers in the 1860s and 1870s.

- William T. Vollmann, You Bright and Risen Angels (Picador, 1987; p. 34)

From ‘Something Happened’

The linings of the brain. (The linings of my brain, they give me such pain.) The linings of my brain are three in number and are called collectively the meninges. They surround it on the outside. The innermost is called the pia mater. It is a delicate, fibrous, and highly vascular membrane (gorged with veins and capillaries, I suppose). I feel pressure against it from inside. Things bubble and shove against it as though they might explode. It reminds me at times of a cheese fondue. The pia mater, reinforced by the two supporting layers, the arachnoid and the dura mater, holds fast against the outward expanding pressure of my brain, pushes back. At times, there is pain. The name pia mater derives from an imperfect translation into Latin of Arabic words that meant (ha, ha) tender mother.

- Joseph Heller, Something Happened (Knopf, 1974, p. 541-42)

Milosz on hailing from a backwater

How true- this quote, a favorite of mine:

“I see an injustice: a Parisian does not have to bring his city out of nothingness every time he wants to describe it. A wealth of allusions lies at his disposal, for his city exists in works of word, brush, and chisel; even if it were to vanish from the face of the earth, one would still be able to recreate it in the imagination. But I, returning in thought to the streets where the most important part of my life unfolded, am obliged to invent the most utilitarian sort of symbols and am forced to condense my material, as is usual when everything, from geography and architecture to the color of the air, has to be squeezed into a few sentences. A certain number of engravings, photographs, and memoirs do exist, of course, but these are generally little known beyond the narrow confines of the region itself. Moreover, the natives lacked perspective and most of the time paid no attention to what now seems to me worth thinking about.”

- Czeslaw Milosz, beginning paragraph from “City of My Youth” (Native Realm: A Search for Self-Definition, trans. C.S. Leach, Doubleday, 1968)

Posthumous digital letters

There’s a nice article at The Millions by Niamh Ní Mhaoileoin (“You’ve Got Mail: On the New Age of Biography”):

Holroyd’s suggestion that the computer represents a turning point in biographical writing carries some weight.  After centuries of shuffling papers, biographers must now deal with the sudden digitization of the self, and the behavioral changes that have followed. Contemporary literary biographies — of Susan Sontag, David Foster Wallace, Nora Ephron, John Updike, all of whom adopted email quite late in their lives — are petri dishes for a new age of biography.

What’s going to happen to all your digital information when we die, anyways? Do you have a plan for that? There’s a whole host of legal and practical unknowns. Digital data’s great, but precarious. Read all about it at the Digital Beyond.

Something Happened

Something Happened
The book designers weren’t told to make an object resembling a hearse or coffin, but they did anyways, a beautiful black and gold object. I bought my Knopf “Book Club edition” of this dark classic for seven Canadian bucks at Encore Books in Montreal two years ago.

And it is a hell of a book. Its voice belongs to Bob Slocum,  a father-of-three, mid-level executive living in Connecticut. His one son is mentally retarded, a fact he can’t fully countenance. Slocum is terrified of inarticulacy, of speechlessness. He is depressed, but he is not. (Unless depression means something like a permanent negative outlook or worldview, an all-encompassing and unremitting pessimism. Fear of everything, of closed doors, of other people, of mortality, strokes, illness, senility, debility, speechlessness, of accidents.

What a fucking book. Its darkness on a level with William Gass’s The Tunnel, Christina Stead’s The Man Who Loved Children, Lionel Shriver’s We Need to Talk About Kevin, William Styron’s Lie Down in Darkness, Richard Yates’s Revolutionary Road, and John Steinbeck’s The Winter of Our Discontent. Or Thomas Bernhard.

I’ll shut up. And let Heller’s Bob Slocum speak for himself.

*

All our summers have been bad. And most of our Sundays. And still are. How I dread those three- and four-day weekends. I wish my wife and I played tennis or enjoyed going on boats for sailing or fishing. But I don’t; I don’t even enjoy people who do. I don’t even enjoy anything anymore. (323)

*

I have a bitter urge now to reproach her, to shout at her, to reach out and hit her, to kick her very sharply under the table in the bones of her leg. I have an impulse often to strike back at the members of my family, even the children, when I feel they are insulting me or taking advantage. Sometimes when I see one of them in the process of doing something improper, or making a mistake for which I know I will be justified in blaming them, I do not intercede to help or correct but hold back in joy to watch and wait, as though observing from a distance a wicked scene unfold in some weird dream, actually relishing the opportunity I spy approaching that will enable me to criticize and reprimand them and demand explanations and apologies. It horrifies me; it is something like watching them back fatallay toward an open window or the edge of a cliff and offering no warning to save them from injury or death. It is perverse and I try to overcome it. There is this crawling animal flourishing somewher inside me that I try to keep hidden and that strives to get get out, and I don’t know what it is or whom it wishes to destroy. I know it is covered with warts. It might be me; it might also be me that it wishes to destroy) and, succeeding in stifling my anger beneath a placid smile, say:

“Pass me the break, will you, dear?” (111)

*

I molested a child. I was molested as a child. Everyone is molested.  (337-8)

*

I know what hostility is. (It gives me headaches and tortured sleep.) My id suppurates into my ego and makes me aggressive and disagreeable. Seepage is destroying my loved ones. If only one could vent one’s hatreds fully, exhaust them, discharge them the way a lobster deposits his sperm with the female and ambles away into opaque darkness alone and unburdened. I’ve tried. They come back. (390)

*

I do indeed know what morbid compulsion feels like. Fungus, erosion, disease. The taste of flannel in your mouth. The smell of asbestos in your brain. A rock. A sinking heart, silence, taut limbs, a festering invasion from within, seeping subversion, and a dull pressure on the brow, and in the back regions of the skull. It starts like a fleeting whim, an airy frivolous notion, but it doesn’t go; it stays; it sticks; it enlarges in space and force like a somber, inhuman form from whatever lightless pit inside you it abides in; it fills you up, spreading steadily throughout you like lava or a persistent miasmic cloud, an obscure, untouchable, implacable, domineering, vile presence disguising itself treacherously in your own identity, a double agent–it is debilitating and sickening. It foreshadows no joy–and takes charge, and you might just as well hang your head and drop your eyes and give right in. You might just as well surrender at the start and steal that money, strike that match, (masturbate), eat that whole quart of ice cream, grovel, dial that number, or search that forbidden drawer or closet once again to handle the things you’re not supposed to know are there. You might just as well go right off in whatever direction your madness lies and do that unwise, unpleasant, immoral thing you don’t want to that you know beforehand will leave you dejected and demoralized afterward. Go along glumly like an exhausted prisoner of war and get the melancholy deed overy with. I have spells in spare time when it turns physically impossible for me to remain standing erect one second longer or to sit without slumping. They pass. I used to steal coins from my sister and my mother–I couldn’t stop. I didn’t even want the money. I think I just wanted to take something from them. I was mesmerized. I was haunted. I wanted to scream for help. I had only to consider for an instant the possibility of taking a penny or a nickel again from a satin purse in a pocketbook belonging to my mother or sister and it was all over: I would have to do it. I was possessed by the need to do it. I would plod home through snow a mile if necessary in order to get it then. I had to have it then. I took dimes and quarters too. Ididn’t enjoy it, before or afterward. I felt lousy. I didn’t even enjoy the things I bought or did. I gambled much of it away on pinball machines at the corner candy store (and felt a bit easier in my mind after it was lost). I didn’t feel good about a single part of it, except getting it over with–it was an ordeal–and recovering. After a while the seizures ended and I stopped. (The same thing happened with masturbation, and I gave that up also after fifteen or twenty years.) (489-91)

Jerusalem, Palestine, Sebald, New Directions

Following on the theme of my last post on W.G. Sebald, I thought I’d drag out this old find to see if any of this blog’s readers can help my understanding of an unusual change that occurred to a photograph in Sebald’s Die Ausgewanderten: Vier lange Erzählungen (1992) when it was translated by Michael Hulse and published in English by Harvill as The Emigrants (1996).

Part three of The Emigrants is a kind of family history, or intimate biography, of the narrator’s great-uncle Ambros Adelwarth that ostensibly draws on and incorporates postcards, photographs, and a diary/travelogue  directly into the text. In 1913, on the eve of WW I, Adelwarth and another man travel from France to Istanbul and to the Holy Land. “On the 27th of November Ambros notes that he has been to Raad’s Photographic Studio in the Jaffa Road and has had his picture taken, at Cosmo’s wish, in his new striped robe” (p. 140-41).

Adelwarth - New Directions

Oddly enough, the German-language text of the book (at least the one I consulted – Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag, 1997) reveals a different image, one which encloses the portrait-sitter within a photostudio border.

Ambros Adelwarth in Sebald's The Emigrants

Why the change? Supposing that there is a reason and that it wasn’t just due to some pressing difficulty in the layout process, – ? - I can only surmise that the publishers at New Directions acted deliberately in cropping out the frame. If so, they effectively scratched out the adjacent words Jerusalem and Palestine. Maybe it wasn’t deliberate, or Sebald ordered the crop. But if the move came from the publisher, I wonder if it wasn’t motivated by the judgment that it would be preferable to omit two words sure to remind readers of a conflict and an annexation that continue today and never fail to inspire strong sentiment. The irony is that the manipulation of historical, photographic evidence to political ends, which Sebald’s books often underline and portray, might have occurred in the process of reaching his English-speaking audience.

I might very well be reading too much into this, or not. In any case if you’ve anything to add, I’d appreciate your thoughts on this unusual find.

The first paragraph has been slightly revised since this article’s first posting.

March reading log

Poem 61 – Catullus

On the Genealogy of Morality (1887) – Friedrich Nietzsche

“Ward No. 6″ (1892) “In the Ravine,” “A Boring Story” – Anton Chekhov

The Approximate Man and Other Writings – Tristan Tzara (begun; trans. & ed. Mary Ann Caws)

“The Country Doctor” (1910s?) – Franz Kafka (trans. W. & E. Muir; re-read)

“Ten Indians” and “In the Indian Camp” – Ernest Hemingway

Zeno’s Conscience (1923) – Italo Svevo (trans. W. Weaver, 2001; abandoned at p. 120)

Break of Day - Colette (skimmed)

Sanctuary (1931) – William Faulkner

The Well-Wrought Urn: Studies in the Structure of Poetry (1947) – Cleanth Brooks (partial)

Cronopios and Famas - Julio Cortazar

The Winter of Our Discontent (1961) – John Steinbeck (re-read parts of)

Something Happened (1966) – Joseph Heller

‘The Island,’ ‘Firebird,’ ‘Willie’s Throw,’ ‘and nobody objected…’, ‘Mountaineers Are Always Free!’ (1985-1991) – Paul Metcalf (all of these most fantastic)

“Beyle, or Love is a Madness most Discreet” (1990) – W.G. Sebald (in Vertigo, trans. M. Hulse; re-read)

Some poems by Charles Bernstein from Recalculating and All the Whiskey in Heaven

A few unpublished stories of friends

J Cohen on Sebald

It’s not that easy to review books well, I know. Novelist Joshua Cohen probably does too, as he’s been at it for a while now reviewing for Harper’s and now the New York Times. 

In any case, there’s a few things that rankle in his review of W.G. Sebald’s latest posthumous publication, A Place in the Country (2014). I wouldn’t comment on this, except that I’ve read all of Sebald’s novels (and After Nature) twice and wrote a thesis on The Emigrants. Cohen:

W. G. Sebald was born in 1944 in Wer­tach im Allgäu in the Bavarian Alps, educated in Germany and Switzerland, taught literature in England for three decades, and between 1990 and 2001 became world famous for “Vertigo,” “The Emigrants,” “The Rings of Saturn” and “Austerlitz” — four novels about Jews, set variously in Vienna, Venice, Verona, Riva, Antwerp, Prague, Paris, Suffolk, Manchester and Long Island.

My lord, “four novels about Jews” just won’t work. Austerlitz and The Emigrants, yes, but the focus in Vertigo and The Rings of Saturn is hardly Jewry. My only guess is that he hasn’t read these novels, and so is relaying the commonly touted affiliation of Sebald with Jews and the Holocaust. Then he says

“A Place in the Country,” which contains profiles of five writers and one painter, is the third volume of nonfiction Sebaldiana to appear in English, and the most casually generous, not least because it’s the last.

“Sebaldiana”–I cringe, and ask, why? why invent this clumsy-ass word? Don’t other words work? Sebaldian, fine, but… ugh. This, and a few strange stylistic tics/flourishes, make this review rather inelegant. See that weird, smart aside concluding the opening paragraph:

Shortly after “Austerlitz” was published in English, Sebald died in a car crash. Mortal: the universal identity.

Anyways, we all err. Anyways.

Jefferson’s spinny chair

Maddy’s desk faced the west window, which was even wider than the south or north. In his swivel chair past and present found shape: steel and white enamel plasticompo and the button that ran the swivel won only a tense counterpoise from the truth that this chair was in idea the same swivel Thomas Jefferson invented.

- Joseph McElroy, Hind’s Kidnap, Harper & Row, 1969. P. 53.

thomas jefferson's swivel chair 1

Jefferson’s revolving Windsor chair which he purchased in 1775-76. The writing arm was added later at Monticello. (Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society)

Montreal Review of Books, Spring ’14

The spring issue of the Montreal Review of Books is freshly out, in print and online. Nestled in there you’ll find my review of Byron Ayanoglu’s latest book, a novel in two parts called A Traveler’s Tale (DC Books).

William Gass online exhibition

William H. Gass’s writing is so good, it’s overwhelming, almost too much. Metaphor is like junk food to this man, so he says. If you’re slightly more of a Gass fan than I am, you would find the following of great interest: three previously published essay collections are being re-issued this year: On Being Blue, Tests of Time and The World within the Word all coming back into print, that’s pretty amazing (NYRB, Dalkey). And last year the online exhibit “William H. Gass: The Soul inside the Sentence” went online (and in gallery).

Over at the online gallery you can

explore drafts of published and unpublished writings, recordings of his interviews and readings, photographs and scans of important documents and objects that have shaped his life.

Update: Also of note is this 2013 interview.

The complete Dalkey Archive catalog

Earlier this week, Dalkey Archive Press published a brief, up-to-date version of their list of titles published (some forthcoming). It’s organized by country and much easier to browse than their website. Very handy, and worth a look — Dalkey’s catalog never ceases to amaze.

Their spring catalog of forthcoming titles is out too.

Larousse for kids

IMG_5497

Jeepers creepers these are great little books! They fell into my hands, given to my family by long-time family friends who are selling a house and still in the middle of a massive purge and sale of furniture, books, etc.

IMG_5498

My two-year-old daughter has a lovely way of throwing books at her parents, and before I knew it I was looking at the words Alfred Jarry, at which point I was jolted into alertness. What’s the notoriously reckless, amoral, and blasphemous Jarry doing in book for kids?! No sooner was I taking in this surprise than I saw quotations from Arthur Rimbaud, Madame de Sévigné, Jacques Prévert, Pierre Reverdy, Guillaume Apollinaire, Valéry Larbaud, Jules Renard, Joachim du Bellay, Jacques Roubaud, Stéphane Mallarmé, Chateaubriand, Rousseau, Colette, Henri Michaux, and on and on and on….

February reading log

“The Marquise of O.”, “The Earthquake in Chile,” “Betrothal in San Domingo” (1810?) – Heinrich von Kleist (trans. David Constantine)

“The Nose” (1840?) - Nikolai Gogol

The Black Spider (1842) - Jeremias Gotthelf (trans. Susan Bernofsky)

A Season in Hell (1873) - Arthur Rimbaud (trans. Bertrand Mathieu; re-read)

Prancing Nigger (1924) - Ronald Firbank

Time Regained (1926) - Marcel Proust

Poets in a Landscape (1957) – Gilbert Highet

The Buenos Aires Affair (1973) – Manuel Puig

A Hall of Uselessness (2011) – Simon Leys

“A breach of judgment of an unforgivable kind”

Tendency, counter-tendency: list-mania, list-aversion. They’re both out there, all over my RSS feed.

Listening to audio of Douglas Glover’s interview of Gordon Lish from 1994, I was surprised as all hell to hear Lish saying this kind of thing. Granted, I perhaps ought not to be surprised, given Lish’s reputation for having an inflexible and uncompromising personality… but, my god, a falling out over a few differences in one’s personal canon?!

“Bloom and I had been great, good pals for a number of years; and that friendship came to a very abrupt end, not without relation to a list of writers he proposed special attention be accorded, and given that that list included on it rather robustly non-Bardic poets of the order of Rita Dove, and failed to cite Jack Gilbert for example, I found a breach of judgment of an unforgivable kind. Such a breach was one of not a few of same, and I didn’t feel I could maintain relations with Bloom with honor. [...] I could not let myself keep myself in a friendly relation to him subsequent to the list that he, for whatever reasons that he was persuaded to publish it, did publish.” (Lish’s remarks, around the 8:00 mark in part 1 of the audio)

There’s boldness for you. Whether Lish’s coldness towards Bloom is a kind of literary snobbism, or an honorable attempt to live by his rigorous standards, I don’t know. Snobbism mostly, it strikes me. What do you think?

R Firbank’s Sorrow in Sunlight

One of the more remarkable titles I read this month was a novella by English fiction writer Ronald Firbank (1886-1926). The copy I read was a 1962 New Directions paperback which collects two of Firbank’s last completed works, The Flower Beneath the Foot (1923) and Prancing Nigger (1924). The edition includes a Firbank chronology by Miriam K. Benkovitz, from which I glean that Firbank originally intended for the title of the Prancing Nigger to be Sorrow in Sunlight. (Editor Carl Van Vechten, working for Brentano’s in New York, renamed the novella, presumably on the grounds that the shocking title would sell copies.) I was drawn to read the latter of the two pieces that are collected in the volume largely on the basis of its shorter length, which I imagined would be a good short introduction to Firbank’s work, and also by that, indeed, shocking title. I had first come across the author’s name with some puzzlement when I was reading an interview with Harry Mathews, wherein the interviewer praised Tlooth (1966) and pointed out a resemblance between its and Vainglory‘s (a novel by Firbank) beginnings.

While I can see the grounds for a comparison between Mathews’s and Firbank’s work, I found Firbank’s style in Prancing Nigger to be more reminiscent of Djuna Barnes’s work (Nightwood, 1936, being the sole title of hers I know well) and John Hawkes’s work. A touch of Nathanael West’s merciless and cruel humor too. Firbank’s style proudly displays its inheritance from the decadence and sophistication of the French fin-de-siècle style: refined, sophisticated, elegant, effete even.

Set on an unnamed, Cuba-like Caribbean isle, Prancing Nigger records the dissolution of a provincial family as they move to the isle’s small capital city at the relentless prompting of Mrs. Ahmadou Mouth, who is eager to move up in society and to find eligible suitors for her two young daughters, Edna and Miami. Her husband, whom she addresses invariably with the epithet prancing nigger (hence the title Van Vechten chose), is only a minor character ineffectually fending off her wordly ambitions, and the drama unfolds primarily around Edna and Miami. One of these eventually becomes the paramour of a young local aristocrat. Her brother joins a street gang of sorts and drifts away from the family. As far as plot goes, that’s about it. Oh yes — there’s also a going-away party, an earthquake, an opera fundraiser, a parade, and a character eaten by a shark.

But the style! The mix of pidgin English and Creole, with the narrator’s detached, sophisticated commentary is striking. Have a sampling:

“Start de gramophone gwine girls, an’ gib us somet’in’ bright!” Mrs. Mouth exclaimed, depressed by the forlorn note of the Twa–oo-Twa-oo bird, that mingled its lament with a thousand night cries from the grass.

“When de saucy female sing: ‘My Ice Cream Girl,’ fo’ sh’o she scare de elves.”

And as though by force of magic, the nasal soprano of an invisible songstress rattled forth with tinkling gusto a music-hall air with a sparkling refrain.

There’s also a sly self-referential trick whereby Firbank inserts himself into the text, a kind of signature which, in comparison to the meta-fictional tricks of later authors, seems tasteful, quaint, and restrained:

“She seem fond ob flowers,” Mr. Mouth commented, pausing to notice the various plants that lined the way: from the roof swung showery azure flowers that commingled with the theatrically-hued cañas, set out in crude, bold, colour-schemes below, that looked best at night. But in their malignant splendour, the orchids were the thing. Mrs. Abanathy, Ronald Firbank, (a dingy lilac blossom of rarity untold), Prince Palairet, a heavy blue-spotted flower, and rosy Olive Moonlight, were those that claimed the greatest respect from a few discerning conoisseurs.

Flipping through the pages of The Flower under the Foot, I see Firbank couldn’t resist doing the same there too:

Have you Valmouth by Ronald Firbank or Inclinations by the same author?” she asked.

“Neither I’m sorry — both are out!”

I will definitely keep an eye out in used shops for Valmouth and Vainglory, not to mention Inclination and Caprice, Firbank’s other novels. Dalkey Archive Press, if I remember correctly, publishes a collection of his stories. This is an author deserving of a wider readership. (Although I suspect that, among the adventurous, his readership is already wider than anyone can measure or foretell.)

Note 1: As Dan Visel indicates to me on Twitter, Carl Van Vechten was… something else. You can read all about it here in a review of Edmund White’s biography of Vechten (LARB).

Note 2: For the interested, an e-text of Firbank’s last completed work Concerning the Eccentricities of Cardinal Pirelli is available at Project Gutenberg Canada.

The Bio-Work of Art

I can’t be the first one to see an uncanny resemblance between Christian Bök’s Xenotext project and the bio-art of Orfeo‘s protagonist, can I?

Novelist Richard Powers is on the latest episode of Bookworm, talking with Michael Silverblatt about his latest book Orfeo. (Word to the wise — start listening to Silverblatt’s show, if you don’t already know it.) The book’s protagonist is apparently an avant-garde composer of music at work on a project to embed his musical masterpiece in the genetic code of a germ. As Silverblatt puts it, he’s “on the threshold of creating virtual, terroristic music.” Or, as Powers says, he’s trying to “encode a private musical message, embed it into the nucleus of a living cell, and have that cell propagate in the world carrying his little MP3 cassette with it, filling up a world that’s absolutely incapable of hearing it.”

Bök’s Xenotext is described as a nine year project to engineer “a life-form so that it becomes not only a durable archive for storing a poem, but also an operant machine for writing a poem.” (Read about it in Bök’s own words here.)

In both cases, the appeal of the idea of genetically encoding the work of art is to to make something that will be “legible” to life for a period longer than any material artifact.

Powers mentions two bio-artists during the podcasts: Brazilian Eduardo Kac, and American Steve Kurtz. Incredibly interesting stuff, even to skim.

Updike’s The Centaur

I agree with the underlying rationale of Bookslut’s Daphne Awards (see Jan 27 post) : indeed, often the best books of their times are overlooked in favour of the much hyped and rather conventional title.

“If you look back at the books that won the Pulitzer or the National Book Award, it is always the wrong book. Book awards, for the most part, celebrate mediocrity. It takes decades for the reader to catch up to a genius book, it takes years away from hype, publicity teams, and favoritism to see that some books just aren’t that good.

Which is why we are starting a new book award, the Daphnes, that will celebrate the best books of 50 years ago. We will right the wrongs of the 1964 National Book Awards, which ugh, decided that John Updike’s The Centaur was totally the best book of that year.”

But have the writer(s) at Bookslut who refer disparagingly to Updike’s The Centaur actually read it? I have, and it’s fantastic! It would be nice to see the book itself acknowledged in more than just a facile, all-too-simple, disparaging manner. I found it to be quite original: a small-town mythology that, in its later phases, branches out to a lyrical, epistolary Manhattan moment. The strange and slow after-school at-the-diner scene, the car that time and time again won’t start to barrel over the rural hills from the cold Pennsylvania farmhouse to the high school, the spider in the narrator’s father’s colon, and the beauty of a snow day — hell, I would read it again. It’s all very beautiful and affecting. But then I’m a white male. Where’s my copy?

I know the point isn’t The Centaur; it’s in fact all the other books published that year; but regardless, that “ugh” strikes me as modish, just as it’s become fashionable to speak of the U.S.’s (former) celebrity novelists (Philip Roth, John Updike, Norman Mailer, etc.) as if they were hopelessly conventional and reactionary. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Adrian West on Pablo Neruda’s awfulness

Translator Adrian West keeps a wonderful blog. If you haven’t ever visited it or if you don’t follow it, it’s well worth the time. West’s articles consistently impress me with their erudition and argument and, perhaps above all, their refined, elegant style.

In a recent post (“The Awfulness of Pablo Neruda”) West points out that Pablo Neruda was, in life, a horrible person, citing some rather damning evidence in support of this. In particular, Neruda’s reputation as a love poet is problematized by the matter of his horrible treatment of his wife, and his rape of a chambermaid. It’s enough to prevent me from looking admiringly at Neruda again. Though he hadn’t been a favourite poet of mine, I did marvel at some of his earlier work, and this surely complicates what feeling of admiration his poems arouse in me.

In other Neruda news, it looks pretty clear that Neruda was almost certainly executed under the Pinochet regime by lethal injection, and did not die from cancer as had previously been reported and believed.

Flarf authority

Dr. Jonathan Skinner, teaching a creative writing unit in the Warwick University Writing Programme, asks his students to write flarf poetry. For a definition of flarf poetry, he links to my posts on the topic, “Flarfarama.” Now that’s something.

Round-up: Classics of Literary Criticism

I threw the question out on Twitter, “is Erich Auerbach’s Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature (1953) the greatest single work of literary criticism ever written?” I think it probably is, but I was hoping some other readers might contradict me or suggest some other worthy candidates for the distinction. Then I thought about it some more. So here’s some whoppers of literary criticism; I’ve read only three-and-a-half of these, and I’m sure as hell missing a lot in the few years between 335 B.C. and 1930 A.D. So, as always, comments are welcome and encouraged, below or on Twitter (@jsief).

* * *

Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature (1953) - Erich Auerbach

History of English Prose Rhythm (1912) - George Saintsbury

Anatomy of Criticism (1957) – Northrop Frye (@bswbarootes)

The Novel: An Alternative History, 2 vols. (2010) – Steven Moore

Seven Types of Ambiguity (1930)William Empson (@JustinPfefferle)

The Well-Wrought Urn: Studies in the Structure of Poetry (1947) – Cleanth Brooks (@bswbarootes)

The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and Critical Tradition (1953) - M.H. Abrams

Biographia Literaria (1817) - Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The Rhetoric of Fiction (1961) – Wayne C. Booth

The Sense of an Ending (1967) - Frank Kermode

The Counterfeiters, The Stoic Comedians, The Mechanic Muse (1968-1987) - Hugh Kenner

The Banquet Years (1955) – Roger Shattuck

Fiction of the sixties

At his blog, D.G. Myers has a pretty damn good long bibliography of American fiction of the sixties (+600 titles). This period in American publishing seems to have been an unprecedented explosion of literary innovation, and it seems equally overlooked by those who are enthusiastic and by those who deplore the state of literary fiction in America today.

An awful lot of forgotten authors in there, although – as Daniel Green pointed out on Twitter – a few are still missing: Ronald Sukenick, Gilbert Sorrentino, Rudolph Wurlitzer, Marguerite Young, William Goyen, Richard Farina… Even I had to remind Myers of Harry Mathew’s place in there, one of the greatest living American writers in my book. No such bibliography, the moral may be, can ever be complete.

Audio resources

I’ve added to the links in the sidebar and organized them by type. In particular check out some of these fantastic, free audio resources:

Center for Art of Translation
KCRW’s Bookworm
Lannan Foundation
Librivox Free Audiobooks
Miette’s Bedtime Podcast
New Yorker Fiction Podcast
Penn Sound
Ubu Web

In almost every case, the archive/repository is vast, almost overwhelmingly so. Particularly so with Michael Silverblatt’s excellent show Bookworm — the archived episodes go all the way back to early 90s, with high-quality recorded conversations with Norman Mailer, Don Delillo, Toni Morrison, Susan Sontag, W.G. Sebald Laszlo Kraznahorkai, Rick Moody, Will Self, David Foster Wallace, you name it, it’s there, on and on and on to no end.

If I go blind, I’ll be relying on these.

January reading log

After doing the year-end round-up recently, I’ve started to keep better track of what I’m finishing, just dipping into or looking back at, or abandoning midway through. Roughly 1,500 paper pages read this month, 9 or so complete books.

Read

La Princesse de Clèves (1678) – Madame de Lafayette (trans. Nancy Mitford (1951), New Directions)

Haunted House (1930) – Pierre Reverdy (trans. John Ashbery (2007), Brooklyn Rail/Black Square)

Return to My Native Land (1939; 1956) - Aimé Césaire (trans. Clayton Eshleman and A. James Arnold, Wesleyan UP, 2013; trans. Anna Babstock & John Berger, Archipelago Books, 2014)

Solar Throat Slashed (1948) - Aimé Césaire (trans. Clayton Eshleman, Wesleyan)

Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature (1959) - Erich Auerbach (Princeton)

The Number and the Siren: A Decipherment of Mallarmé’s Coup de dés (2012) Quentin Meillasoux, (trans. Robin Mackay, Urbanomic/Sequence Press)

L’Autre modernité (2012)- Simon Nadeau (Boréal)

The Examined Life (2012) – Stephen Grosz (Random House)

The Traveler’s Tale (2013) – Byron Ayanoglu (DC Books)

Begun or dipped into

Jacques the Fatalist - Denis Diderot

Père Goriot  - Honoré de Balzac

The Quotable Kierkegaard - Søren Kierkegaard (ed. Gordon Mortimer, Princeton UP, 201?)

The Collected Poems of Constantine Cavafy - Constantine Cavafy (trans. Aliki Barnstone, W.W. Norton)

Hind’s Kidnap: A Pastoral on Familiar Airs (1969) - Joseph McElroy

Mulligan Stew (1979) - Gilbert Sorrentino

Abandoned

The Living End - Stanley Elkin

Medal for ingratitude

 

In William H. Gass’s The Tunnel, published by Knopf in 1995.

It’s not very pretty, but that’s exactly the point.

Far Tortuga

I’ve not yet read Far Tortuga, but I noticed there’s some beautiful symmetry going on in the use of concrete/typographical forms — here especially.

 

Far Tortuga - P Matthiesson

 

John Latta has a good post about the book, as good an introduction as any if you’re curious.

James Spanfeller’s illustrations

Every time I go to Ohio, I make a point to stop at Dark Star Books, a great used bookshop in Yellow Springs I’ve blogged about before. My latest trip yielded more good finds: two books by Lynne Tillman, Svevo’s Zeno’s Conscience (trans. William Weaver), Stanley Elkin’s The Living End, and Frederick Exley’s A Fan’s Notes (Harper & Row, 1968). As soon as I glanced at the cover, I recognized the painstakingly detailed and ornate artwork of James Spanfeller.

 

 A Fan's Notes - F Exley - Spanfeller's cover art

 

I recognized the style, and the face, from the incredible dust jacket of Hind’s Kidnap: A Pastoral on Familiar Airs (Harper & Row, 1969). Click on the image, zoom in, and look closely; you’ll see grasshoppers, pupae, birds, and more there in Hind.

 

Hinds-Kidnap-J-McElroy-Spanfellers-cover-art-839x1024

 

Both these books were produced under the editorship of legendary editor David Segal, who was at Harper & Row before moving to Knopf in about 1970. A little light research shows that James Spanfeller also did these other book illustrations — each quite exceptional, I think. Photos culled from a Google Image search.

I also see, for those who are interested in digging deeper, that Spanfeller did illustrations for Pages from Cold Island by Frederick Exley, Little Men by Louisa May Alcott, Quill by Robert Steiner, and various other books by Larry Niven, May Sarton, and Julia Cunningham. Various other great illustrations are online here.

2014 books dropping

I’m going to hop on the bandwagon for a sec, and tell you what 2014 books you can be excited about. Didn’t used to do this kind of thing, but it’ll take me 15 minutes to rattle this one off, so… lifting descriptions of these books freely from publisher’s websites, here we go…

Continue Reading

Year in reading, ’13 and ’14

The list of books read this year, ordered chronologically by date of original publication. In bold are works I consider well worth their time, and even a second read. Also included is a list of what I project I’ll read (or want to read) in the year to come. (Why, by the way, in the flood of “year-end reading lists” that bloggers flood the Internet with as soon as December hits, don’t I see others making lists of what they envision ahead  in the year to come? My projections from last year from last year turned out to be risibly inaccurate to what I eventually read, and so I for one wouldn’t place much stock in what I say  I’ll read… For now these French classics look like bliss.)

Continue Reading

The Charterhouse of Parma

I felt I had to read The Charterhouse of Parma (1839), but I felt it as a duty, an obligation, and I failed to predict the abundance of pleasures and delights it would bring me, how fully I would be absorbed by this lovely, capacious courtly romance that Stendhal (1783-1842) dictated — if you can believe it — in just <em>fifty-two days</em> in the fall of 1838. It is not dense, but it is sprawling and magnificent, an intrepid work with a bit of everything. Love and nobility of the soul are its two great themes, but it is also packed with action, architectural musings, political intrigue, psychological interiority, cruelty, wit and humour, and one fantastic escape. It is Stendhal’s last novel, and it was brought into the world, seemingly, fully-formed. I can’t recommend it highly enough. It will enlarge your heart and your soul, to say nothing of your attention. Fabrizio del Dongo is the book’s hero, a noble and naive young man, a prisoner and ecclesiastic and fugitive lover of whom his aunt rightly remarks, “If he hadn’t been so lovable, he would be dead”!

Richard Howard’s translation, published by the Modern Library in 1999, reads in a fluid and flawless manner, and also includes an afterword by Howard, Honoré de Balzac’s 1840 review of the book, Stendhal’s letter to Balzac, and Daniel Mendelsohn’s 1999 review of Howard’s translation, which appeared initially in The New York Times Book Review. From these supporting documents I glean the following. Stendhal wrote to Balzac that, “Whilst writing the Chartreuse, in order to acquire the correct tone I read every morning two or three pages of the Civil Code.” – ! Also: Henri Beyle (Stendhal) used over 200 pseudonyms in his lifetime. (Certainly makes me feel like less of a nut for occasionally assuming an alias…)

Put this one on your reading lists.

The Wars, Imagined

Was it even a war, or something else?… I’ve stewed too long in my outrage to be eloquent or tactful. Writings on the history and non-fiction of the bloody war are legion, proliferating as we speak. Too much for me. Here’s a list of resources for the Iraq/Afghan wars in fiction.

Continue Reading

A Sentimental Education

I finished Flaubert’s A Sentimental Education (1869) last week, and boy is it good. I found it hard going at the start, mostly because the author seemed to treating his protagonist with such derision, but after a few hours with the book there was no turning back. For the oceans of ink that have already been spilled over this book, I need add nothing but another hearty endorsement. What a wicked wit was Gustave Flaubert… I can’t recall ever having such a shock in reading a novel as the marriage proposal that materializes in part III, and Frédéric Moreau’s hilarious response. Were one to judge from this classic, one might well believe Robert Burton’s claim in The Anatomy of Melancholy that, “in France, upon small acquaintance, it is usual to court other men’s wives, to come to their houses, and accompany them arm in arm in the streets, without imputation.” Pair this one with Henry James’s “The Beast in the Jungle” (1888).

Notable books and lists of 2013

I don’t read enough books as they come out to pompously draw up a “best books of the year” list, but I do take in a lot of contemporary criticism, so I’m deluged with commentary on the big releases of the year as well as some of the little ones. I don’t think I will ever touch The Goldfinch, The Luminaries, or Bleeding EdgeThe Flamethrowers, The Kraus Project, or any of the other books that I’ve read so much about this year, but here are some of the books that I might eventually track down.

Continue Reading

Now that’s a party

“The band had left. They dragged the piano out of the hall into the drawing-room, Vatnaz sat down at it, and to the accompaniment of the Choirboy’s Basque drum, launched into a wild country dance, hitting the keys like a horse stamping its hooves and lurching to and fro in time with the music. The Marshal carried Frédéric off, Hussonet turned a cartwheel, the Stevedore was twisting and jerking like a clown, while the Clown pretended to be an orang-utan and the Native Woman held her arms out sideways and imitated the pitching and tossing of a ship. In the end, everyone stopped, exhausted. Somebody opened a window.

Daylight streamed in and the cool of the morning. There was an exclamation of surprise and then silence.”

- Gustave Flaubert, A Sentimental Education (1869; p. 138), trans. Douglas Parmée

New design!

If you’re a returning visitor, you’ll notice a pretty big change in the appearance of this site, as of last night. I worked with graphic designer Sasha Endoh to settle on the current appearance, and I’m very thankful to her for putting in the time. She does great design work, and if you need a site revamp she just might be one of the best people out there who could help you get there. I hope you like the site’s new look!

Review: Terre des cons

There’s a new online magazine of Québec literature in translation out there, in fact there’s only one in the whole world, and it’s called ambos (a Spanish word meaning both), and I’m happy to be a contributor to it. If you’re interested, you can hop on over there to read my review and translation from the French of an excerpt from Patrick Nicol’s 2012 novella Terre des cons. It’s a good one!

Continue Reading

MAD on surveillance

Obama and "Spy vs. Spy" on the cover of MAD magazine

As a boy I used to regularly read this outstanding periodical and last month, I was delighted to find that my local pharmacy, Shopper’s Drug Mart, stocks it on their shelves. Coverage is as relevant and as acid as ever, as you can see.

Two of my poems, “Goodbye, Ohio” and “O’ top the mountain,” are up at ohio edit , an interesting hybrid publication venue edited by Amy Fusselman. One was composed a decade ago, another a half-decade ago…

Review: J McElroy’s Ancient History

In the Quarterly Conversation, you’ll find my review of Joseph McElroy’s Ancient History: A Paraphase , which Dzanc is soon reissuing, and Trey Strecker’s review of Cannonball.

From my review:

Whatever the message is, Ancient History and Cy’s manuscript (for they’re one and the same) confront the impossible: Cy seeks in his project to embrace a totality that’s larger and greater than the limits of others’ minds. This high ambition stands parallel to that of Michel Butor’s Degrees (1960; cited by McElroy as a precursor and model for his early work), as well as McElroy’s first novel, A Smuggler’s Bible (1966), whose central protagonist, David Brooke, has “perfect recall.” Similarly gifted, Cy has in his brain an unusually developed “Vectoral Muscle” that enables rare feats of attention, perception, and intuition. On the page, this amounts to what Tony Tanner aptly termed a sense of “egalitarian respect for the most apparently modest detail.” A name on an apartment directory-board that’s “mint white grooved in velvety black,” for instance, or, an egg sandwich seen with “the gold-gray damp of the grease coming into the Pepperidge Farm white.” Like these minute touches, McElroy’s prose can, at its best, almost conjure synesthesia.

Continue Reading

Continuing the French literature kick I’m on (Huysman, Gide, Flaubert, Simenon…), and in time for the centennial of Proust’s Du Côté de chez Swann (1913), here’s a photo of a couple of street signs in my ‘hood. Gratuitous, almost.

"Swan's Way"

Not quite Swann’s Way; but good enough for this francophile.

Review: M. Segura’s Eucalyptus in the mRb

My review of Mauricio Segura’s novel Eucalyptus is online (and in print!) in the Montreal Review of Books fall 2013 issue. Segura’s short novel is translated by Donald Winkler and available from the excellent Biblioasis.

From the review:

The story’s protagonist, Alberto Ventura, has returned to Temuco in Araucania for the funeral of his father, Roberto. Over several packed days, he tries to understand his father’s life story and mysterious death, gradually piecing together a composite narrative from contradictory accounts offered up by those who knew him. Assembling the pieces isn’t easy, as Alberto’s father’s life is structured around a handful of discontinuities. We see him in elliptical vignettes, alternately as a leftist activist in the early seventies, as a political prisoner under Pinochet, later as a Canadian immigrant and family man, soon as a philandering, abusive husband, and, ultimately, as the owner of a Chilean plantation when he returns to his homeland at the end of the dictatorship in 1990.

Continue Reading

Gide’s Lafcadio on readership

“Poor Julius! So many writers and so few readers! It’s a fact. People read less and less nowadays…. to judge by myself, as they say. It’ll end by some catastrophe–some stupendous catastrophe, reeking with horror. Printing will be chucked overboard altogether; and it’ll be a miracle if the best doesn’t sink to the bottom with the worst.”

Lafcadio’s Adventures (Les Caves du Vatican, 1914), André Gide, trans. Dorothy Bussy, p. 178-179

George Trow’s education

“My father had, let us call it, a tendency toward schizophrenia. [...] By the age of four, although I could not read, I knew what a headline was, what a lead story was, which columnists were respectable and which were not (I learned to loathe Westbrook Pegler before I was in kindergarten), and so on. I learned what the Times represented, and what the Daily News represented, and the difference between the News and the Mirror, and who Old Man Hearst was, and what was wrong with Roy Howard (Head of the Scripps-Howard chain), and on and on.”

- George W.S. Trow, My Pilgrim’s Progress: Media Studies, 1950-1998 (p. 11)

Henry James on work and focus

To live in the world of creation — to get into it and stay in it — to frequent it and haunt it — to think intently and fruitfully — to woo combinations and inspirations into being by a depth and continuity of attention and meditation — this is the only thing — and I neglect it, far and away too much; from indolence, from vagueness, from inattention, and from a strange nervous fear of letting myself go. If I vanquish that nervousness, the world is mine. X X X X X

- The Notebooks of Henry James, Oxford University Press, 1947. P. 112.

Continue Reading

Richard Powers on narratology

The discoveries made by various literary scholars, such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Gérard Genette, Mieke Bal, Algirdas Julien Greimas, and Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan, have had a profound influence on the way I write, and I truly believe that they provide wonderfully efficient shortcuts for writers to discover expressive possibilities that might otherwise take decades of trial and error to figure out.

- in Contemporary Literature 49(2)

Continue Reading

Billy Burroughs and Neuromancer

Something I’m working on led me to check a few passages in Kentucky Ham (1973), which I read in 2006 or thenabouts. It’s published by the Overlook Press with Speed (1970). Both are memoiristic novels by William S. Burroughs, Jr. (1947-1981), son of the more well-known and longer-lived William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

And I noticed this passage on the first page of Kentucky Ham, which seemed to resonate in my memory with the memorable opener to Neuromancer:

When I returned, or rather imploded from New York City (Viceville–I know a place where one can buy retarded children for whatever use–$2,000, give or take), I wasn’t using speed, it rather seemed that my entire metabolism had developed a speed deficiency. (Kentucky Ham, p. 167; Overlook Press, 1993).

Compare with Neuromancer (1984) by William Gibson (1948):

“It’s not like I’m using,” Case heard someone say, as he shouldered his way through the crowd around the door of the Chat. “It’s like my body’s developed this massive drug deficiency.” (Neuromancer, ch. 1)

There’s not really much to make of this kind of correspondence, except to take it as a reminder of intertextuality, of how writers borrow and steal from what’s available. There’s also the considerable pleasure or delight one takes in discovering instances of literary theft like this one.  (W.G. Sebald’s novels are an especially fertile ground for tracking and discovering embedded texts, along these lines.)

Dalkey Archive Press has posted on their website a massive list of works in the canon… Worth a look. A few in there I might track down when the time frees up.

T Morrison’s The Bluest Eye banned for incest

Ohio Board of Education President Debe Terhar wants all mentions of the Toni Morrison novel The Bluest Eye removed from state guidelines for schools teaching to the new Common Core academic standards. She thinks the book is “pornographic.”

Continue Reading

Excerpt: J Hawkes’s The Cannibal

With weird sinisterness, a passage from John Hawkes’s first novel (1949) defamiliarizes a house so that it’s a shark:

The house where the two sisters lived was like an old trunk covered with cracked sharkskin, heavier on top than on the bottom, sealed with iron cornices and covered with shining fins. It was like the curving dolphin’s back: fat, wrinkled, hung dry above small swells and waxed bottles, hanging from a thick spike, all foam and wind gone, over many brass catches and rusty studs out in the sunshine. As a figure that breathed immense quantities of air, that shook itself in the wind flinging water down into the streets, as a figure that cracked open and drank in all a day’s sunshine in one breath, it was more selfish than an old General, more secret than a nun, more monstrous than the fattest shark. (page 60)

Great, eh?

Continue Reading

Reviews: J McElroy’s Cannonball

There’s about seven reviews of Cannonball (Dzanc, 2013) out there. Here are the links and short commentary.

Continue Reading

Excerpt: FS Fitzgerald’s Tender Is the Night

Fitzgerald’s problematic relationship with alcohol is amply evident in this memorably brilliant, incisive passage:

Often people display a curious respect for a man drunk, rather like the respect of simple races for the insane. Respect rather than fear. There is something awe-inspiring in one who has lost all inhibitions, who will do anything. Of course we make him pay afterward for his moment of superiority.

Continue Reading

Excerpt: Gaddis’s J.R.

Just one of those incredible sentences, masterful in its god-like yet very human perspective:

To the squeal of brakes, the car burst out into the world trailing a festoon of privet, swerved at the immediate prospect of open acres flowered in funereal abundance to regain the pavement and lose it again in a brief threat to the candy wrappers and beer cans nestled along the hedge line up the highway, that quickly out of sight to the windows’ half-shaded stare from the roof pitches frowning over the hedge to where it ended, and a yellow barn took up, and was gone in a swerving miss for the pepperidge tree towering ahead, past shadeless windows in a naked farmhouse sprawl at the corner where the road trimmed neatly into the suburban labyrinth and things came scaled down to wieldy size, dogwood, then barberry, becomingly streaked blood-red for fall. (page 17)

Joe Brainard remembers Dayton

(This is an update to the post Dayton in books: a collage.)

Joe Brainard’s I remember (1975) is an incredible book, touching, intimate, and beautiful. It consists of more than 1,000 brief entries that begin with the words “I remember.”

Joe Brainard's I remember cover image

Brainard was from Tulsa, Oklahoma, went to New York City where he remained friends with Ron Padgett, and met Kensward Elmslie, John Ashbery, Ted Berrigan, and others of the New York poets of the 60s and 70s. He’s remembered as both an artist (painter, sketch artist?) and as a writer of about ten other books.

Just a few excerpts on Brainard’s brief stint in Dayton, Ohio, where he had a scholarship through the Dayton Art Institute:

I remember when I won a scholarship to the Dayton, Ohio, Art Institute and I didn’t like it but I didn’t want to hurt their feelings by just quitting so I told them that my father was dying of cancer. (53)

I remember in Dayton, Ohio, the art fair in the park where they made me take down all my naked self-portraits. (53)

I remember a girl in Dayton, Ohio, who “taught” me what to do with your tongue, which it turns out, is definitely what not to do with your tongue. You could really hurt somebody that way. (Strangulation.) (153)

UPDATE: The amazing PennSound archive has a 1/2 hr. recording of Joe Brainard reading from this work.

Review: T. Heise’s Moth (Montreal Review of Books)

I wrote a review of Moth; or, how I came to be with you again, and the review is posted online at the Montreal Review of Books. Check it out. Moth is good, worth purchasing. Sarabande Books is in Louisville, Kentucky, a city to which I owe an eventual visit, being a native of nearby Dayton, Ohio. They do an excellent job, judging from what I’ve seen of their publishing work.

Continue Reading

Dimock’s George Anderson VS. Coetzee’s Vietnam Project

I acquired and began it but gave up on it (around page 85 out of 160) in the middle of last week. This is a rare abandonment, and there remains the possibility I’ll resume it. The writing was compelling, but seriously dry, repetitious, and boring in another. I felt as if the book’s author and narrator were so repetitious and given over to formalities — the conceit of the book’s formally rigid method — that my time was being wasted. And we have so little time, it cannot afford to be wasted.

The only book I have read that is like it is the short work of J.M. Coetzee The Vietnam Project, which makes up the first half of Dusklands (1974), Coetzee’s first published work.

Continue Reading

Montreal book exchange

It’s great to see the creation of shared public book drops, like this one in front of the Coopérative la Maison Verte on Sherbrooke St in Montréal.

Coopérative la Maison Verte, 5785 Sherbrooke S, where I've enjoyed many a coffee and much company

Coopérative la Maison Verte, 5785 Sherbrooke W, where I’ve enjoyed many a coffee and much company

Take a book, leave one. Public drop-box, on the honor system.

Continue Reading

Joseph McElroy at MOMA

MoMA has archived the video of Joseph McElroy’s lecture on water from earlier this year.

Continue Reading

Notes on Gide’s The Counterfeiters

Slowly I am making my way through André Gide’s amazing novel The Counterfeiters (Les Faux-monnayeurs, 1926). When I was in high school I read and enjoyed Gide’s The Immoralist on the strong recommendation of a sharp and very literary fellow barista named Crystal. But The Immoralist is a much more simple tale than the complex assembly of parts that is The Counterfeiters. You should read The Counterfeiters. Although it should be, it is not widely read today. This masterpiece of a fiction shows Gide in virtuosic control of his craft. Emotional depth, mystery, intrigue, scandal, plot complexity, economy of language, suspense, universality–all are there in abundance. And I am only a third of the way through the book’s 350 pages.

Continue Reading

The typographical imagination of children

The letter E, as suggested by a twig

Letters in nature?! My daughter was walking along the sidewalk when she spotted the letter in the bramble  of a shrub.

Best of kids’ books (for a four year-old)

Brief notes on our favourite kids’ books of late, including the Toot and Puddle series by Holly Hobbie, A River of Words: The Story of William Carlos Williamsby Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet, The Slightly Irregular Fire Engine; or The Hithering Thithering Djinn by Donald Barthelme.

Continue Reading

Exquisite spam

Since I migrated Bibliomanic away from Wordpress.com, I have the pleasure of relentless spam comments, none of which I approve. Nevertheless, many are a laugh riot. This blog would be a funnier publication if I let a few of the good ones slip through. Thus, see here:

The following Ive been trying to get help re my famliy being hijacked by people who steal dead bodies. Its a real shame that govt blocks people asking for help, its also a shame that john key sabotaged my help from IHRO when they confronted him about it. Shame on you nz politicians for supporting child abusers.

that has nothing to do with politics louis vuitton hlouis vuitton handbags replicabags replica everything to do with how we are being duped for paying for things that

Continue Reading

Dayton in books – a collage

Though it’s no literary capital, the city of Dayton, Ohio crops up in the work of Toni Morrison, Joe Brainard, Ralph Ellison, Vladimir Nabokov, Kurt Vonnegut, and others. Let’s compare.

Continue Reading

Ways of arranging books

In the posthumous work Penser/Classer (which title one might translate as To Think/To Classify), Georges Perec outlined what he saw as the only possible criteria for arranging one’s books:

  • alphabetically
  • by continent or country
  • by colour
  • by date of acquisition
  • by date of publication
  • by format
  • by genre
  • by major periods of literary history
  • by language
  • by priority for future reading
  • by binding
  • by series
Continue Reading

From Mailer’s Of a Fire on the Moon

‘Then it came, like a crackling of wood twigs over the ridge, came with the sharp and furious bark of a million drops of oil crackling suddenly into combustion, a cacophony of barks louder and louder as Apollo-Saturn fifteen seconds ahead of its own sound cleared the lift tower to a cheer which could have been a cry of anguish from that near-audience watching; then came the earsplitting bark of a thousand machine guns firing at once, and Aquarius shook through his feet at the fury of this combat assault, and heard the thunderous murmur of Niagaras of flame roaring conceivably louder than the loudest thunders he had ever heard and the earth began to shake and would not stop, it quivered through his feet standing on the wood of the bleachers, an apocalyptic fury of sound equal to some conception of the sound of your death in the roar of a drowning hour, a nightmare of sound, and he heard himself saying, “Oh, my God! oh, my God! oh, my God! oh, my God! oh, my God! oh, my God!” but not his voice, almost like the Italian girl saying “fenomenal,” and the sound of the rocket beat with the true blood of fear in his ears, hot in all the intimacy of a forming of heat, as if one’s ear were in the caldron of a vast burning of air, heavens of oxygen being born and consumed in this ascension of the rocket, and a poor moment of vertigo at the thought that man now had something with which to speak to God — the fire was white as a torch and long as the rocket itself, a tail of fire, a face, yes now the rocket looked like a thin and pointed witch’s hat, and the flames from its base were the blazing eyes of the witch. Forked like saw teeth was the base of the flame which quivered through the lens of the binoculars. Upwards. As the rocket keened over and went up and out to sea, one could no longer watch its stage, only the flame from its base. Now it seemed to rise like a ball of fire, like a new sun mounting the sky, a flame elevating itself.’

- from Norman Mailer’s Of a Fire on the Moon (1970), p. 93. Signet Classics paperback.

Bibliomanic migrates

Thanks in part to the Web System Design course I’m taking, I’ve learned some HTML, XML, and CSS basics. I’m still no expert, but I find it amazing what I’ve learned in the short span of a month and a half.

Continue Reading

An Interview with Stéfan Sinclair

In mid-January of this year, I paid a visit to Stéfan Sinclair, who is Associate Professor of Digital Humanities in McGill’s Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. Since he received his Ph.D. in French literature, Professor Sinclair has worked on numerous projects designing digital humanities text visualization tools, often in collaboration with other scholars. He was most generous and open in responding to my questions as we sat in his windowed office overlooking the intersection of rue Sherbrooke and rue University.

Continue Reading

Metalist: List of book lists

Thousands of other book lists must be out there. I was list obsessed, in recovery now. I am. For those of you who like me like lists of books, this post has it covered. It kicked around for a long time, fermenting. No further ado–the list of lists.

Continue Reading

Flarfarama, pt. 2

Behold: a selection of some of the most search phrases entered by visitors to this site (via WordPress site statistics).

Continue Reading

An experiment in self-publishing

Responses to the Threat of Technological Distraction,’ the paper I wrote for the philosophy of technology seminar in which I was enrolled this semester, is now complete. I’ve assigned a Creative Commons license to the work and am self-publishing it here. If you read it, I would appreciate any impressions or feedback.

Continue Reading

Flarfarama

Although I didn’t know it at the time, in 2007 I was writing flarf poetry. Flarf exemplifies the random, heterogeneous, often absurd character of spam e-mails and of other information available on the web, appropriated and blended into a discontinuous (non-sequiturs rule) mesh of colorful language. It’s striking for its aforementioned absurdity, sudden shifts of subject, its non-hanging-togetherness. If there is meaning in flarf, generally speaking, that meaning consists in the flarf poet’s attempt to mirror (or simply record, curate, edit) special instances of digitally-mediated language, almost always removed from — what? everything? — context, human relationships, an immediate setting which would give the totally of the poem its traditional meaning.

discontinuity in modernist form

An unpublished work of mine; not however, flarf.

Seeing months ago via Rod Smith’s Facebook feed that two Mel Nichols videos were featured on the Huffington Post set off a train of thought that led me here, to bibliomanic, to speak of flarf. In the mid-aughts, I used to see these two poets, Rod Smith and Mel Nichols, when I attended the regime of regular Thursday night pub-crawls that they and Dan Gutstein (my then poetry teacher, at George Washington U) followed.

Most of my flarf was a long poem without any line breaks I wrote on a typewriter in drafts and in numerous revisions on a computer: ‘Starving revelation tooth factory’. The title (a riddle, the answer of which is something like the human body in frenzy, pleases me, but the poem is unsatisfactory to me today, with the rest of my so-called “juvenilia” (in fact, this was the name of a collection I put together when I was about fifteen), it’s a little embarrassing. “Starving revelation tooth factory” is a narcissistically jagged long poem. Contains some flarf elements, much autobiographical incident, a heaping bucketful of discontinuous imagery, flibbertigibbet and other what-have-you, “kerflaffle-fla-flam,” and even the following (which I can still admire the beauty of):

felicific calculus
apophenic pareidolia
psychoramic steganography
thrombic lycocoptyopenic purpura
gnitirw erutuf sdrawkcab
meop ni esrever

That’s not flarf. And neither is Charles Bernstein. My attitude towards flarf poetry is ambivalent, but I don’t like it. On Wikipedia on the ‘Flarf’ page I read:

‘I love a movement that’s willing to describe its texts as ‘a kind of corrosive, cute, or cloying awfulness.’ - Joyelle McSweeney

Ugh. Flarf surrenders to the sometimes-vacuity of the digital infoscape. And for me, it seems rooted in the first eight years of the new millenium, standing opposite George W. Bush’s empty rhetoric, littered with mistakes and itself hollow, void of meaning, like the image flarf attempts to project of language as existing in a weird vacuum of truth and human intimacy or even intelligence.

I don’t think that art or literature or poetry needs to be engagé to be meaningful, but poetic language should not be complicit with the prevailing inane discourses that they have the power to counteract.

W.G. Sebald’s exoticisms

I’ve held on to this post so long, held on for so long to these ideas, I am letting this post go, rough as it is. It will never be finished. It is the story of a kind of failure, itself evidence of failure, a quest for understanding that remains forever incomplete. As more fragments will follow, I finally let go of these. Sebald’s work is, I have found, very difficult to talk about.

We have a habit of writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover up all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or how you had the wrong idea at first, and so on. So there isn’t any place to publish, in a dignified manner, what you actually did in order to do the work. - Richard Feynman

Reluctant to enclose Gide in a system I knew would never content me, I was vainly trying to find some connection among these notes. Finally I decided it would be better to offer them as such–notes–and not try to disguise their lack of continuity. Incoherence seems to me preferable to a distorting order. – Roland Barthes, ‘On Gide and His Journal’

I knew the research paper would be about W.G. Sebald’s novels, but that was all I knew. I had fallen under Sebald’s spell, not on first reading The Emigrants in a ‘Continental Modernism’ course taught by the ribald WW II vet Robert Ganz, but in 2009 on reading The Rings of Saturn after seeing a poster for a lecture by Ross Posnock on Austerlitz, a poster prominently displaying Sebald’s provocative juxtaposition of Wittgenstein’s gaze with that of perhaps a rhesus monkey.

It was only a short time before I had read After Nature, the long poem Sebald published in the late eighties before his arrival as a published novelist; Vertigo, his first novel; and, of course, Austerlitz, his last. I was hypnotized and hooked on Sebald’s writing, fallen under the intense spell cast by Sebald’s long sentences and his visual materials.

Through work in a graduate seminar in contemporary French literature–La Fabrication de l’irréelle dans la littérature française contemporaine–I became familiar with a strange new term which would prove to be for me a challenge and a source of anxiety, later, to explain. Le post-exotisme en dix lecons by Antoine Volodine is not a difficult book, but it is, like Volodine’s other works, strange, however much it is consistent with Volodine’s conception of a mythological future-past of ruins, internment camps, political resistance. He expresses his vision through hybrid literary forms.

Post-exoticism resonated with what I found compelling in Sebald. Volodine’s vision, realized in his novels and elucidated in theoretical terms, amounts to:

  • Une littérature de l’ailleurs, venue d’aileurs, allant vers l’ailleurs
  • Une littérature internationaliste, cosmopolite, dont la mémoire plonge les racines dans les tragédies du XXe siecle, les guerres, les révolutions, les génocides et les défaites du XXe siecle
  • Une littérature étrangere écrite en francais
  • Une littérature qui mêle indissolublement l’onirique et le politique
  • Une littérature des poubelles, en rupture avec la littérature officielle
  • Une littérature carcérale de la rumination, de la déviance mental et de l’échec
  • Un édifice romanesque qui a surtout a voir avec le chamanisme, avec une variante bolchevique de chamanisme (387)

From Volodine, Antoine. ‘A la frange du réel.’ In Défense et illustration du post-exotisme en vingt lecons (vlb, 2008).

Translation: post-exoticism is:

  • a literature of elsewhere, arriving from, departing from elsewhere;
  • an internationalist, cosmopolitan literature whose memory is rooted in 20th-century tragedies, wars, revolutions, genocides, defeats;
  • a foreign literature written in French;
  • a literature where  the dream-like and the political are seamlessly joined
  • trashcan literature, opposed to ‘official’ literature(s)
  • an imprisoned, ruminatory literature, of pyschopathology and failure
  • a novelistic structure closely tied to shamanism, especially a Bolshevik variant of shamanism.

Elsewhere: a cabal of prisoners secretly circulating texts, working to overcome the isolation imposed on them.

The proposal I wrote in anticipation of my research paper was lucid, engaged, clear, direct, promising. But as I researched and wrote my paper, and continued to over-research it, my focus was exploded and irreversibly lost. In the end I tried to stay close to Sebald’s text. But at times, for whole months, I felt I needed to write lengthy theoretical contextualizations and justifications for why I was talking about post-exoticism, a term that I was never comfortable with, because its sense was split.

On the one hand, Volodine and his elucidation of post-exoticism; on the other hand, a non-literary but totally contemporary post-exoticism, related to the breaking up of empires, the acceleration of travel, and the end of an era during which romantics like Pierre Loti, Paul Gauguin, Victor Segalen, and Jean-Léon Gérôme, and a whole host of other European artists, were able to see in other cultures a difference which they found attractive, sometimes repelling, and that they patronized and acted condescendingly towards. (Edward Said’s historical work on Orientalism is what I’m talking about here; in a post-exotic era, Orientalism and exoticism are not done away with, but their historical contours are entirely changed.) I’d also read exoticists like Loti and was aware of Victor Segalen (his law regarding the attractions of human diversity, expounded in his posthumously published Essai sur l’exotisme (1978)) from having reading Baudrillard’s books, where he  refers repeatedly to Segalen and exoticism.

The first problem, which I could not circumvent must have been establishing a stable relation between exoticism and post-exoticism.

Ambros Adelwarth in Sebald's The Emigrants

An antique photo-studio portrait included in the German edition of W.G. Sebald’s The Emigrants (1992), depicting the narrator’s great-uncle Ambros Adelwarth.

I couldn’t even define the type of exoticism that I was seeing in Sebald, it was too variegated and broad and heterogeneous.

Even now I can read in my notebook the organisational sketches I was making in 2009, but I can’t create true order out of them:

KINDS OF SEBALDIAN EXOTICISM

a) the collection (museum)

b) monumental architecture (inadvertent; neglect, disuse, decay…) (cf. The Eyes of the Skin; The Architectural Uncanny, Anthony Vidler)

c) tourist narrators

d) Jews, gypsies, circus performers

e) resort culture

f) ‘overheated, deterritorialized animals’ (cf. On Creaturely Life, Eric Santner)

g) formal syntax (syntactical)

h) Obsolete Objects in the Literary Imagination: Ruins, Relics, Rarities, Rubbish, Uninhabited Places, and Hidden Treasures. (Yale P, 2006.)

The problem was, I couldn’t describe the exoticist tropology at work in Sebald’s prose, because I wanted to read all five of his books–his entire ‘creative’ output– as if it were a single thing. This would have left no time for ‘close reading’ and it would have been abstracted from the individual context of any single book. But I felt a coherent exoticist strategy, complete with post-exoticist gesturing, was there; a coherent preoccupation with and nostalgic yearning for the historical ‘exotic,’ itself complicated by the knowledge that this was at best an impossible fantasy. Perhaps I ought to have chosen just one (or two) types of exoticism and pursued it as far as I could. But I could not relinquish my commitment to some larger, more elusive totality that always remained just beyond my conceptual, organisational grasp.

It was almost ironic that I discovered such excellent books on exoticism just as the time I had left to trim up my drafts was drawing to a close.

‘the phenomenon of the human zoo illuminates an interdependence, similar to that discussed and popularized by Edward Said in Orientalism (1978), between science, spectacle and colonial power’ (Forsdick 378).

‘Populations put on display were depicted in a variety of forms, ranging from posters t illustrated programmes, from postcards (reproduced and translated into several languages to early films, from amateur photographs to the front pages of newspapers. Visitors, readers and spectators would be fascinated by these human subjects, while at the same time being convinced by them of the ‘racial hierarchies’ central to the contemporary context of colonial expansion.’ (‘Human Zoos: The Greatest Exotic Shows in the West,’ illustration pages)

Some Sources:

Barthes, Roland. 1982. A Barthes Reader. Ed. Susan Sontag. Hill and Wang.

Baudrillard, Jean. ‘Radical Exoticism.’ Transparency of Evil. Verso.

Blanchard, Pascal, Bancel, Nicolas, Boëtsch, Gilles,  Deroo, Éric, and Lemaire, Sandrine . ‘Human Zoos: The Greatest Exotic Shows in the West.’ By 1-49.

Camus, Audrey. Her winter 2008 graduate seminar on the work of Volodine, Eric Chevillard and Pierre Senges.

Feynman, Richard. 1966. ‘The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics.’ Science 153 (3737): 699-708.

Loti, Pierre. Aziyadé. 1880s?

Obsolete Objects in the Literary Imagination: Ruins, Relics, Rarities, Rubbish, Uninhabited Places, and Hidden Treasures. (Yale P, 2006.)

Segalen, Victor. ‘Essay on Diversity.’

Audio: Joseph McElroy reading at the New School

Last week I traveled to New York City, to lower Manhattan, to hear Joseph McElroy read from his work. Here’s the audio from that event.

Continue Reading

Purple-ish books

Five books, ranging from magenta to purple to violet: T. Bernhard's Frost, M. Foucault's Technologies of the Self, B. Latour's We Have Never Been Modern, G. Sorrentino's Mulligan Stew, and J. McElroy's Lookout Cartridge.

Running the gamut from magenta to purple to violet: T. Bernhard’s Frost, M. Foucault’s Technologies of the Self, B. Latour’s We Have Never Been Modern, G. Sorrentino’s Mulligan Stew, and J. McElroy’s Lookout Cartridge. Notably absent: I. Watt’s The Rise of the Novel.

1998, the year must have been, because Clive Barker signed my copy of Galilee, which he was touring in support of. He spoke of the frustration of working within the commercial publishing industry:

You talk for fifteen minutes about something very deep, like metaphysics, and then they say,

Yeah, I’m thinking of, like, a purple cover for this book.

A somewhat rare thing, a purple book. But I have some.

From my bookshelf my elder daughter A.Z. asked once for Lookout Cartridge by telling me,

I want the purple book. 

I let her have it. Have you purple books? I want to know.

20 lines a day, or the notebook of Harry Mathews

Harry Mathews
(Picture by Arthur Gerbault, 1988.)

20 Lines a Day by Harry Mathews (1988, Dalkey Archive) is an excellent book. It compiles a selection of entries from Mathews’ notebook from March 16, 1983 to June 26, 1984.

Continue Reading

Interview with a NaNoWriMo vet

NaNoWriMo is a website (and more) dedicated to the goal of helping individuals achieve the realisable goal of writing a novel, defined loosely as a narrative of 50,000+ words. It’s run by the Office of Letters and Light, a self-described ‘tiny but mighty nonprofit.’

Continue Reading

Heidegger on philosophy

For the philosophy of technology seminar I’m taking, I summarised and presented a ‘lecture course’ of German philosopher Martin Heidegger,’The Fundamental Question of Metaphysics’ (published originally in 1935; from Introduction to Metaphysics, translated by G. Fried and R. Polt; New Haven: Yale, 2000; 1-54.)

Continue Reading

Sage advice from Albert Borgmann

“A reform [of technology] is the recognition and restraint of the pattern of technology so as to give focal concerns a central place in our lives.” – Albert Borgmann

Continue Reading

Joseph McElroy’s bookshelf

A partially annotated bibliography of works, many somewhat obscure today, referenced by American novelist Joseph McElroy.

Continue Reading

A Joseph McElroy Web bibliography

All in one place: a compendium of (free) Web resources for those interested in exploring American literature’s best-kept secret.

Joseph McElroy photographed by Steve Hall. From page 235 of Anything Can Happen: Interviews With Contemporary American Novelists (conducted and edited by Larry McCaffrey and Tom LeClair;  Champaign: U of IL P, 1983).

Continue Reading

Joseph McElroy on my mind

Just how many are we? Standers in awe of the best-kept secret in American literature? Avid readers, McElroy maniacs. His books now penetrate my life, as my life extends into them. If we note McElroy’s seeming obscurity, let’s not however miss the essential: the growth, the accretion, the writing: of the eight novels, the book of short stories, the uncollected essays and journalism work. Nevermind the tag-lines and reductionist claims that he’s the ‘lost postmodernist’ (LA Times book review); the ‘most important of all “unknown” postmodernist American authors’ (Larry McCaffrey), whose work is the ‘great unmined motherlode of American fiction’ (Michael Silverblatt). These generalizing claims carry little weight relative to what really counts, for me the unflagging spirit of inquiry and reflection — spiritual, intellectual, epistemological, scientific, idiomatic, and otherwise — that characterizes, perhaps in a fractal manner, the man’s loveable, mind-boggling prose.

Continue Reading

The office of William Gaddis

W Gaddis's office

The office of William Gaddis. Image from Paper Empire: William Gaddis and the World System, eds. Joseph Tabbi & Rone Shaver. U of Alabama P, 2007. P. 146.

we don’t know how much time there is left and I have to work on the, to finish this work of mine while I, why I’ve brought in this whole pile of books notes pages clippings and God knows what, get it all sorted and organized — William Gaddis, Agape Agapē, (1)

Continue Reading

Aldous Huxley in NDG

aldous huxley graffiti mural

Turns out my friend’s right: the subject of the mural isn’t Pasolini, it’s the author of Brave New World, Ape and Essence, Heaven and Hell, Chrome Yellow, and The Doors of Perception. The graffiti is surely based on a photograph of Huxley that’s freely available on the web.

Continue Reading

Commonsplacing

“The Trouville Gazette reported that a veritable wave of the exotic had broken upon Deauville that year: des musulmans moldo-valaques, des brahmanes hindous et toutes les variétés de Cafres, de Papous, de Niam-Niams et de Bachibouzouks importés en Europe avec leurs danses simiesques et leurs instruments sauvages.” – W.G. Sebald, The Emigrants

Continue Reading

Tactical and strategic vices of the American Enlightenment

Seek it out Joseph J. Ellis’s book Founding Brothers if you’ve any interest in American history whatsoever, or an inkling of sentimentality about the Founders, the Revolution, or the Constitution.

Continue Reading

A pluricephalic Bukowski

I’m no fan of Charles Bukowski, the notoriously, riotously inebriated California beat poet, let there be no mistake, but perhaps in a former life I once was. That’s why the apparition of this graffiti during my family’s drive through a back alley, along with the joy of kite-flying, made my Sunday.

Montreal residents know that the alleys of their city are well adorned with graffiti both tasteful and the tasteless

All the world’s memory, 1956

The simplest way to describe Toute la mémoire du monde is to say that it’s a short documentary film of the setting and institutional practices of the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris as they were in the late 1950s. The film begins in the basement of the library, where gross heaps of documents are consigned to a process of slow degradation. Parce que leur mémoire est courte, les hommes accumulent d’innombrables prosthèses, Dumesnil announces. [Because its memory is short, mankind accumulates limitless prostheses.]

Screen shot 2012-07-06 at 10.50.15 AM

Continue Reading

Slogans for writers from Walter Benjamin

“Let no thought pass incognito, and keep your notebook as strictly as the authorities keep their register of aliens.” “Genuine polemics approach a book as lovingly as a cannibal spices a baby.”

Continue Reading

Thoughts on Internet distraction, pt. 2

There’s a lot of dystopic-sounding studies of computers and networks out there, and it’s hardly a new trend: Trapped in the Net; Life on the Screen; The Pearly Gates of Cyberspace; Silicon Shock; The Net Effect: Romanticism, Capitalism, and the Internet; Technobabble; Digital Diaspora; Cyburbia; Slaves of the Machine; Moths to the Flame; High Noon on the Electronic Frontier; Monster or Messiah?; Digerati; War of the Worlds.

Continue Reading

Categorical conspicuity

Dark Star Books and Comics in the village of Yellow Springs, Ohio, keeps their classification schema posted in their front window. Cool, eh?

Dark Star Classification System

Continue Reading

Thomas Jefferson, Ergonomist

Polymath of Albemarle county, Thomas Jefferson invented for his own use several ergonomic devices to reduce cumulative physical stress resultant from reading and writing. Of especial note are an ingenious revolving book-stand, a portable writing desk, and a swivel chair.

Revolving Bookstand

Portable writing desk

Continue Reading

Calligram: Fleur-de-lys for QC

In honor of June 24 and of my five years in Montréal, here’s a calligram I made while I was living in Westmoreland County in, Virgina and planning my escape to la belle province:

 

Fleur-de-lys cropped

au Québec je vais bientôt vivre

tabernacle de merde l’an dix-sept-cent-soixante-three

faut que je m’équippe des mocassins

pour toi, chère nation non-choisie

comment ça va mes bons copains

de vous connaître je suis ravi

Kateri,   Daphné,    Ghislain

Salutations,

métropole sulpicienne

 

Thoughts on Internet distraction, pt. 1

Nicholas Carr believes — and shows, using lots of evidence drawn from research in neuroscience and cognitive science (the book is shelved in McGill’s Osler medical library) — that our interlinked computing technologies pose a serious challenge to deep thought, hampering our capacity to reflect and contemplate in meaningful ways. This isn’t exactly a groundbreaking claim; at least, not for anyone who has had the experience of, while piloting a web browser, being unable to focus for any length of time on the task at hand, or who has found their attention increasingly diverted and distributed through a web of hyperlinks. Figures of speech to describe our computerized, information-saturated mental state abound: popcorn brainmental obesity are among the most apt. Forget information overload.

Four books

Also pictured: Information Anxiety (Richard Saul Wurman); Within the Context of No Context (George W.S. Trow); and Future Shock (Alvin Toffler).

Continue Reading

Bibliomanic in the Twilight Zone

From the vaults of the Twilight Zone:

Time Enough at Last 001

Mild-mannered and myopic, bank-teller Henry Bemis loves to read, but neither his shrewish wife nor efficiency-minded boss give him much chance. Sneaking into the vault on his lunch hour to read, he is knocked unconscious by a mammoth shock wave. When he comes to, he discovers that the world has been devastated by a nuclear war and that he, having been protected by the vault, is the last man on Earth. He decides to commit suicide, but at the final moment his eyes fall in the ruins of a library. For him, it is paradise. Gleefully he piles the books high, organizing his reading for the years to come. But as he settles down to read the first book, his glasses slip off his nose and smash, trapping him forever in a hopelessly blurry world.

Continue Reading

Neurobiological aspects of reading

The almost frictionless processing of this information takes place mostly in a particular region of the brain: Dehaene says we can find it ‘on the edge of the left occipito-temporal fissure’…

Continue Reading

Aby Warburg’s tale

Now I will recount the true and tragic tale of Aby Warburg (1886-1929), whose bibliomaniacal obsession with myth, icon, symbol, and meaning across cultures and through the ages led to his pyschic disintegration.

Aby Warburg reading

Warburg concentrating, looking a shade like Proust.

Continue Reading

The tyranny of taste

Randall referred at length to Ernest van den Haag’s book The Fabric of Society […] and quoted Santayana’s words, ‘It is worth living in the twentieth century to get to read Proust.’ Then he asked, ‘Is it worth it to get to read Peyton Place? We ought to say what we know. It’s better to read Proust or Frost or Faulkner… better in every way: and we ought to do all we can to make it possible for everybody to know this from personal experience. When we make people satisfied to have read Peyton Place and satisfied not to have read Swann’s Way we are enemies of our culture… and Jefferson and Franklin and Adams would look at us not with puzzled respect but with disgust and despair.’ – on Randall Jarrell’s address at the National Book Award ceremony

Continue Reading

Sir Tippy’s information jungle

Sir Thomas, known familiarly as Sir Tippy, vowed to own ‘ONE COPY OF EVERY BOOK IN THE WORLD.’ His vast and largely uncatalogued book collection infiltrated every room in his large country house. As a visitor from the Bodleian Library reported is 1854, ‘Every room is filled with heaps of papers, MSS, books, charters, packages & other things, lying in heaps under your feet, piled upon tables, beds, chairs, ladders, &c.&c. and in every room, piles of huge boxes, up to the ceiling, containing the more valuable volumes!’

Continue Reading

The anatomy of bibliomania

The anatomy of bibliomania

Let me say at the outset that this is not a book I intend to read soon in its entirety. The Anatomy of Bibliomania is extraordinary for above all the jocular, ribald hilarity of its table of contents. There are subsections on such topics as: “anti-bibliokleptic measures”; “books bound in human skin”; “bibliopegic dandyism”; and on the “belligerent usefulness” of books. Whole chapters are dedicated to: “book-drinkers”; “bibliophagi or book-eaters”; grangeritis; “the cure of bibliomania” (subsection 1: “whether it is curable or not”; 3: “Bibliophilia is the only remedy”).

Continue Reading