Posts in category: audio resources for literature

Listen up

What if there was a massive not-for-profit archive of free audiobooks of works in the public domain, i.e., the CLASSICS?

Librivox, you mean? If you don’t know it, now is the time. Founded in Montreal by Hugh McGuire, almost a decade ago. A warm encomium by Carlo Rotella here.

Open letter to Michael Silverblatt

I think if I’m lucky I’m a mentor to people I’ve never met – Michael Silverblatt

Among them, Michael, count me. Your Bookworm Audio Archive is vast, a national treasure-house. It would only be absurd to try to number the hours I’ve spent there, or to attempt a comprehensive list of the writers whose voices it preserves. There’s no usable index to the archive as far as I know, and no easy way to browse… but, it’s staggeringly complete… : Mailer, Didion, Sebald, Morrison, Markson, Kraznahorkai, McElroy, Delillo, Mathews, Vonnegut, Updike, Beattie, Sontag, Vidal… that’s just a start to the endless, endless procession. If this is news to whoever reads this, they’re hereby informed. (See also Silverblatt’s role as host and interviewer of writers at the Lannan Foundation.)

Naturally, I first started going to Bookworm to hear Silverblatt in conversation with particular writers. My thesis supervisor had referred me to the Sebald interview, since I was working on his novels. But it soon became obvious that Silverblatt is himself a most unique and fascinating figure, very experienced, and that he’s gifted with a brilliant mind and a warm, rarely generous temperament.

So thanks, Michael Silverblatt, for that mentorship.

– Jacob

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And for other bookworms, anyone curious — here’s some places where it’s Silverblatt who’s being interviewed for a change. Enjoy.

* Colin Marshall’s hour-long podcast with Silverblatt, from which the two quotes that lead this article are transcribed (Notebook of Cities and Culture, April 2012);
* Sarah Fay’s interview with Silverblatt (The BelieverJune 2010);
* J. Robert Lennon’s half-hour of audio spent chatting with him (Writers at Cornell, Oct 2010); and, lastly,
* “An evening with Michael Silverblatt” (1:30 audio recording, Cornell, iTunes U).

M Heppner & J McElroy at Apexart

Joseph McElroy and Mike Heppner did a paired reading in late April at Apexart, which was recorded. The text, which is partly about the 2013 Boston marathon event, is called “What We Noticed.” Check out the video (21:31).

Albert Mobilio, who is from what I can tell a very accomplished critic, was there as the host or moderator of the readings. Event info & videos of other author readings (Wendy S. Walters, Siddhartha DebCatherine Texier, & Minna Proctor) are here at Apex.

Now if you haven’t, go read Mike Heppner’s The Man Talking Project, because it is profound and jugular.

“A breach of judgment of an unforgivable kind”

Tendency, counter-tendency: list-mania, list-aversion. They’re both out there, all over my RSS feed.

Listening to audio of Douglas Glover’s interview of Gordon Lish from 1994, I was surprised as all hell to hear Lish saying this kind of thing. Granted, I perhaps ought not to be surprised, given Lish’s reputation for having an inflexible and uncompromising personality… but, my god, a falling out over a few differences in one’s personal canon?!

“Bloom and I had been great, good pals for a number of years; and that friendship came to a very abrupt end, not without relation to a list of writers he proposed special attention be accorded, and given that that list included on it rather robustly non-Bardic poets of the order of Rita Dove, and failed to cite Jack Gilbert for example, I found a breach of judgment of an unforgivable kind. Such a breach was one of not a few of same, and I didn’t feel I could maintain relations with Bloom with honor. […] I could not let myself keep myself in a friendly relation to him subsequent to the list that he, for whatever reasons that he was persuaded to publish it, did publish.” (Lish’s remarks, around the 8:00 mark in part 1 of the audio)

There’s boldness for you. Whether Lish’s coldness towards Bloom is a kind of literary snobbism, or an honorable attempt to live by his rigorous standards, I don’t know. Snobbism mostly, it strikes me. What do you think?