Posts in category: bibliomania

Letters to a Young Man Whose Education Has Been Neglected

“In my youthful days, I never entered a great library, suppose of one hundred thousand volumes, but my predominant feeling was one of pain and disturbance of mind, — not much unlike that which drew tears from Xerxes, on viewing his immense army, and reflecting that in one hundred years not one soul would remain alive. To me, with respect to the books, the same effect would be brought about by my own death. Here, said I, are one hundred thousand books, the worst of them capable of giving me some pleasure and instruction; and before I can have had time to extract the honey from one-twentieth of this hive, in all likelihood I shall be summoned away. This thought, I am sure, must have often occurred to yourself; and you may judge how much it was aggravated when I found that, subtracting all merely professional books—books of reference, as dictionaries, &c. &c. &c. — from the universal library of Europe, there would still remain a total of not less than twelve hundred thousand books over and above what the presses of Europe are still disemboguing into the ocean of literature, many of them immense folios or quartos. Now, I had been told by an eminent English author, that, with respect to one single work, namely, the History of Thuanus, a calculation had been made by a Portuguese monk, which showed that barely to read over the words (and allowing no time for reflection) would require three years’ labour, at the rate of (I think) three hours a day. Further, I had myself ascertained that to read a duodecimo volume, in prose, of four hundred pages — all skipping being barred, and the rapid reading which belongs to the vulgar interest of a novel — was a very sufficient work for one day. Consequently, three hundred and sixty-five per annum — that is (with a very small allowance for the claims of life on one’s own account and that of one’s friends), one thousand for every triennium; that is, ten thousand for thirty years — will be as much as a man who lives for that only can hope to accomplish. From the age of twenty to eighty, therefore — if a man were so unhappy as to live to eighty — the utmost he could hope to travel through would be twenty thousand volumes,— a number not, perhaps, above five per cent, of what the mere current literature of Europe would accumulate in that period of years. Now, from this amount of twenty thousand make a deduction on account of books of larger size, books to be studied and books to be read slowly and many times over (as all works in which the composition is a principal part of their pretensions), — allow a fair discount for such deductions, and the twenty thousand will perhaps shrink to eight or five thousand. All this arithmetical statement you must not conceive to relate to any fanciful case of misery. No; I protest to you that I speak of as real a case of suffering as ever can have existed. And it soon increased; for the same panic seized upon me with respect to the works of art. I found that I had no chance of hearing the twenty-five thousandth part of the music that had been produced. And so of other arts. Nor was this all; for, happening to say to myself, one night as I entered a long street, “I shall never see the one thousandth part of the people who are living in this single street,” it occurred to me that every man and woman was a most interesting book, if one knew how to read them. Here opened upon me a new world of misery; for, if books and works of art existed by millions, men existed by hundreds of millions. Nay, even if it had been possible for me to know all of my own generation, yet, like Dr. Faustus, who desired to see “Helen of Greece,” I should still have been dissatisfied; for what was one generation to all that were past? Nay, even if it had been possible for me to know all of my own generation, yet, like Dr. Faustus, who desired to see “Helen of Greece,” I should still have been dissatisfied; for what was one generation to all that were past? Nay, my madness took yet a higher flight; for I considered that I stood on a little isthmus of time, which connected the two great worlds, the past and the future. I stood in equal relation to both; I asked for admittance to one as much as to the other. Even if a necromancer could have brought up the great men of the seventeenth century, I should have said, “What good does all this do me? Where are those of the twentieth century? —and so onward! In short, I never turned my thoughts this way but I fell into a downright midsummer madness. I could not enjoy what I had, — craving for that which I had not, and could not have; was thirsty, like Tantalus, in the midst of waters; even when using my present wealth, thought only of its perishableness; and “wept to have what I so feared to lose.”

Thomas De Quincey. “Letters to a young man whose education has been neglected; and other papers.” Pages 82-85.

January reading log

After doing the year-end round-up recently, I’ve started to keep better track of what I’m finishing, just dipping into or looking back at, or abandoning midway through. Roughly 1,500 paper pages read this month, 9 or so complete books.

Read

La Princesse de Clèves (1678) – Madame de Lafayette (trans. Nancy Mitford (1951), New Directions)

Haunted House (1930) – Pierre Reverdy (trans. John Ashbery (2007), Brooklyn Rail/Black Square)

Return to My Native Land (1939; 1956) – Aimé Césaire (trans. Clayton Eshleman and A. James Arnold, Wesleyan UP, 2013; trans. Anna Babstock & John Berger, Archipelago Books, 2014)

Solar Throat Slashed (1948) – Aimé Césaire (trans. Clayton Eshleman, Wesleyan)

Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature (1959) – Erich Auerbach (Princeton)

The Number and the Siren: A Decipherment of Mallarmé’s Coup de dés (2012) – Quentin Meillasoux, (trans. Robin Mackay, Urbanomic/Sequence Press)

L’Autre modernité (2012)- Simon Nadeau (Boréal)

The Examined Life (2012) – Stephen Grosz (Random House)

The Traveler’s Tale (2013) – Byron Ayanoglu (DC Books)

Begun or dipped into

Jacques the Fatalist – Denis Diderot

Père Goriot  – Honoré de Balzac

The Quotable Kierkegaard – Søren Kierkegaard (ed. Gordon Mortimer, Princeton UP, 201?)

The Collected Poems of Constantine Cavafy – Constantine Cavafy (trans. Aliki Barnstone, W.W. Norton)

Hind’s Kidnap: A Pastoral on Familiar Airs (1969) – Joseph McElroy

Mulligan Stew (1979) – Gilbert Sorrentino

Abandoned

The Living End – Stanley Elkin

 

2014 books dropping

I’m going to hop on the bandwagon for a sec, and tell you what 2014 books you can be excited about. Didn’t used to do this kind of thing, but it’ll take me 15 minutes to rattle this one off, so… lifting descriptions of these books freely from publisher’s websites, here we go…

Continue Reading

’13 and ’14 in books

The list of books read this year, ordered chronologically by date of original publication. In bold are works I consider well worth their time, and even a second read. Also included is a list of what I project I’ll read (or want to read) in the year to come. (Why, by the way, in the flood of “year-end reading lists” that bloggers flood the Internet with as soon as December hits, don’t I see others making lists of what they envision ahead  in the year to come? My projections from last year from last year turned out to be risibly inaccurate to what I eventually read, and so I for one wouldn’t place much stock in what I say  I’ll read… For now these French classics look like bliss.)

Continue Reading

Metalist: List of book lists

Thousands of other book lists must be out there. I was list obsessed, in recovery now. I am. For those of you who like me like lists of books, this post has it covered. It kicked around for a long time, fermenting. No further ado–the list of lists.

Continue Reading

Flarfarama, pt. 2

Behold: a selection of some of the most search phrases entered by visitors to this site (via WordPress site statistics).

Continue Reading

Thomas Jefferson, Ergonomist

Adapted from my paper “The Case for Thomas Jefferson as the Father of American Librarianship” and presented at the 6th Doctoral Symposium in Information Studies at the Université de Montréal, March 30, 2012:

Polymath of Albemarle county, Thomas Jefferson invented for his own use several ergonomic devices to reduce cumulative physical stress resultant from reading and writing. Of especial note is this ingenious revolving book-stand:

Shaped like a cube when not in use, the stand could be unfolded to hold five books simultaneously. Hinged at the top, the four vertical sides could be lifted up and angled out. A lip at the bottom of each let a book rest on the angled surface. Furthermore, the top of the cube could be tilted up to hold a fifth book directly above one of the lower books. Even when fully loaded with books, the stand could be easily revolved to let Jefferson quickly peruse multiple texts in succession.

Revolving Bookstand

Also remarkable: a portable writing desk constructed to his specifications. On the angled baize surface of this beauty, Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence.

Made of thin strips of mahogany, the desk was reduced to the minimum size and weight and produced the maximum utility of space. In addition to a folding writing board lined with green baize, it had a bookrest and a drawer with a lock for storing a supply of stationery, completed documents, ink, pens, wafers, and sand. Jefferson continued to use this desk until 1825, when he presented it to his grandson-in-law.

Portable writing desk

The Virginian statesman also devised a chair with a fully revolving base to facilitate easy interaction with print material:

Furniture for writing

Federalist William Loughton Smith ridiculed the chair in the anonymous The Pretensions of Thomas Jefferson to the Presidency Examined, writing: “Who has not heard from the Secretary of State of the praises of his wonderful Whirligig Chair, which has the miraculous quality of allowing the person seated in it to turn his head without moving his tail?”

It may be added that the debt-ridden patrician of Monticello used several different polygraphs (copying machines) during his last 14 years to make a simultaneous copy of his vast correspondence over that period, polygraphing over 5,700 correspondences.

Jefferson's Polygraph

Screen shot 2012-03-09 at 3.46.58 PM

Screen shot 2012-03-09 at 4.24.14 PM

Sources: Bedini’s Thomas Jefferson and His Copying Machines, 1984;

Hayes’ The Road to Monticello: The Life and Mind of Thomas Jefferson, 2008.

Final note: It just so happens that Jefferson’s ingenious chair, with its revolving base, pops up in a passage from Joseph McElroy’s second novel, Hind’s Kidnap (1969):

Maddy’s desk faced the west window, which was even wider than the south or north. In his swivel chair past and present found shape: steel and white enamel plasticompo and the button that ran the swivel won only a tense counterpoise from the truth that this chair was in idea the same swivel Thomas Jefferson invented. Viewed from an approaching helicopter, Maddy Beecher’s office, a white concrete block, perhaps like a huge clamping not just thick enough to hide its bolt, topped the rambling… (p. 53)

Continue Reading

Aby Warburg’s tale

Now I will recount the true and tragic tale of Aby Warburg (1886-1929), whose bibliomaniacal obsession with myth, icon, symbol, and meaning across cultures and through the ages led to his pyschic disintegration.

Aby Warburg reading

Warburg concentrating, looking a shade like Proust.

Continue Reading

Sir Tippy’s information jungle

Sir Thomas, known familiarly as Sir Tippy, vowed to own ‘ONE COPY OF EVERY BOOK IN THE WORLD.’ His vast and largely uncatalogued book collection infiltrated every room in his large country house. As a visitor from the Bodleian Library reported is 1854, ‘Every room is filled with heaps of papers, MSS, books, charters, packages & other things, lying in heaps under your feet, piled upon tables, beds, chairs, ladders, &c.&c. and in every room, piles of huge boxes, up to the ceiling, containing the more valuable volumes!’

Continue Reading

The anatomy of bibliomania

The anatomy of bibliomania

Let me say at the outset that this is not a book I intend to read soon in its entirety. The Anatomy of Bibliomania is extraordinary for above all the jocular, ribald hilarity of its table of contents. There are subsections on such topics as: “anti-bibliokleptic measures”; “books bound in human skin”; “bibliopegic dandyism”; and on the “belligerent usefulness” of books. Whole chapters are dedicated to: “book-drinkers”; “bibliophagi or book-eaters”; grangeritis; “the cure of bibliomania” (subsection 1: “whether it is curable or not”; 3: “Bibliophilia is the only remedy”).

Continue Reading